open access

Vol 72, No 3 (2022)
Research paper (original)
Published online: 2022-05-23
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The effectiveness of a live animal model in a laparoscopic partial nephrectomy for renal cancer training – a survey study

Oleksii Potapov1, Francisco M. Sanchez Margallo2, Andrzej L. Komorowski3
DOI: 10.5603/NJO.2022.0026
·
Nowotwory. Journal of Oncology 2022;72(3):155-160.
Affiliations
  1. State Scientific Institution: Center for Innovative Medical Technologies of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kiev, Ukraine
  2. Jesús Usón Minimally Invasive Surgery Centre, Caceres, Spain
  3. Department of Surgery, College of Medicine, University of Rzeszow, Rzeszow, Poland

open access

Vol 72, No 3 (2022)
Original article
Published online: 2022-05-23

Abstract

Introduction.A laparoscopic partial nephrectomy for kidney cancer is a technically demanding procedure. Among many training approaches a live animal model is considered to be one of the most promising.

Material and methods.During nine editions of a two day live animal laparoscopy course, nine urologists took part in exercises aimed at mastering a partial nephrectomy for kidney cancer. After finishing the courses, an online survey was sent to all participants in order to evaluate the practical implications of the training on a live animal model.

Results.Seven participants responded to the survey. Two attended one course, two attended two courses and three attended more than twice. The number of partial nephrectomies performed during the course ranged from 0 to 20. All participants declared good understanding of the knot formation and stated that they use their obtained knowledge on a regular basis. Six of seven participants would like to repeat the course. All participants would recommend this course to colleagues with no partial nephrectomy experience.

Discussion.A live animal laparoscopy course for experienced urologists can yield positive results in terms of techni­cal abilities and the implementation of minimally invasive techniques into clinical practice. It seems that this type of advanced simulation is better for clinicians than residents. The high level of satisfaction and willingness to repeat the course seem to back up this hypothesis.

Conclusions.The live animal model seems to be an interesting tool in advanced training in minimally invasive partial nephrectomy for kidney cancer.

Abstract

Introduction.A laparoscopic partial nephrectomy for kidney cancer is a technically demanding procedure. Among many training approaches a live animal model is considered to be one of the most promising.

Material and methods.During nine editions of a two day live animal laparoscopy course, nine urologists took part in exercises aimed at mastering a partial nephrectomy for kidney cancer. After finishing the courses, an online survey was sent to all participants in order to evaluate the practical implications of the training on a live animal model.

Results.Seven participants responded to the survey. Two attended one course, two attended two courses and three attended more than twice. The number of partial nephrectomies performed during the course ranged from 0 to 20. All participants declared good understanding of the knot formation and stated that they use their obtained knowledge on a regular basis. Six of seven participants would like to repeat the course. All participants would recommend this course to colleagues with no partial nephrectomy experience.

Discussion.A live animal laparoscopy course for experienced urologists can yield positive results in terms of techni­cal abilities and the implementation of minimally invasive techniques into clinical practice. It seems that this type of advanced simulation is better for clinicians than residents. The high level of satisfaction and willingness to repeat the course seem to back up this hypothesis.

Conclusions.The live animal model seems to be an interesting tool in advanced training in minimally invasive partial nephrectomy for kidney cancer.

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Keywords

laparoscopy; partial nephrectomy; animal model; minimally invasive surgery

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About this article
Title

The effectiveness of a live animal model in a laparoscopic partial nephrectomy for renal cancer training – a survey study

Journal

Nowotwory. Journal of Oncology

Issue

Vol 72, No 3 (2022)

Article type

Research paper (original)

Pages

155-160

Published online

2022-05-23

Page views

391

Article views/downloads

53

DOI

10.5603/NJO.2022.0026

Bibliographic record

Nowotwory. Journal of Oncology 2022;72(3):155-160.

Keywords

laparoscopy
partial nephrectomy
animal model
minimally invasive surgery

Authors

Oleksii Potapov
Francisco M. Sanchez Margallo
Andrzej L. Komorowski

References (13)
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  11. Seo HoS, Eom YH, Kim MKi, et al. A one-day surgical-skill training course for medical students' improved surgical skills and increased interest in surgery as a career. BMC Med Educ. 2017; 17(1): 265.
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  13. Khawaja AR, Ali S, Dar Y, et al. Outcome of laparoscopic nephron sparing surgery using a Satinsky clamp for hilar control: a trusted tool (SKIMS experience). Curr Urol. 2021; 15(3): 172–175.

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