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Review paper
Published online: 2024-01-12
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The role of nutrition in oncological prevention

Katarzyna Wolnicka1
Affiliations
  1. Department of Nutritional Education, National Institute of Public Health NIH – National Research Institute, Warsaw, Poland

open access

Ahead of print
Review articles – Cancer prevention and public health
Published online: 2024-01-12

Abstract

In the global battle against cancer, the second leading cause of death, research aims to identify preventative measures, with over 40% of worldwide cancer fatalities and disability-adjusted life years linked to modifiable lifestyle aspects. Understanding the multi-stage, long-term process of carcinogenesis is vital, as is the identification of contributing factors. By controlling certain lifestyle factors like diet, exercise, smoking, and alcohol consumption, we can mitigate cancer risk.
Leading institutions such as the World Cancer Research Fund and American Institute for Cancer Research have formulated guidelines to reduce cancer risk. These tenets include maintaining a healthy weight, engaging in physical activity, adhering to a balanced diet, limiting alcohol, refraining from smoking, avoiding excessive sunlight, and considering breastfeeding. Many of these principles center on dietary habits, advocating for a varied intake of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and legumes, and limiting red and processed meats and alcoholic drinks.

Emerging research highlights the considerable influence of diet on cancer risk, leading to the formulation of dietary guidelines to minimize this risk. This paper delves into these recommendations and examines the impact of various dietary components and patterns on cancer development.

Abstract

In the global battle against cancer, the second leading cause of death, research aims to identify preventative measures, with over 40% of worldwide cancer fatalities and disability-adjusted life years linked to modifiable lifestyle aspects. Understanding the multi-stage, long-term process of carcinogenesis is vital, as is the identification of contributing factors. By controlling certain lifestyle factors like diet, exercise, smoking, and alcohol consumption, we can mitigate cancer risk.
Leading institutions such as the World Cancer Research Fund and American Institute for Cancer Research have formulated guidelines to reduce cancer risk. These tenets include maintaining a healthy weight, engaging in physical activity, adhering to a balanced diet, limiting alcohol, refraining from smoking, avoiding excessive sunlight, and considering breastfeeding. Many of these principles center on dietary habits, advocating for a varied intake of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and legumes, and limiting red and processed meats and alcoholic drinks.

Emerging research highlights the considerable influence of diet on cancer risk, leading to the formulation of dietary guidelines to minimize this risk. This paper delves into these recommendations and examines the impact of various dietary components and patterns on cancer development.

Get Citation

Keywords

dietary intake; cancer; neoplasms; food intake

About this article
Title

The role of nutrition in oncological prevention

Journal

Nowotwory. Journal of Oncology

Issue

Ahead of print

Article type

Review paper

Published online

2024-01-12

Page views

57

Article views/downloads

53

DOI

10.5603/njo.98446

Keywords

dietary intake
cancer
neoplasms
food intake

Authors

Katarzyna Wolnicka

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