Vol 53, No 6 (2019)
Research paper
Published online: 2019-11-22
Submitted: 2019-07-08
Accepted: 2019-09-30
Get Citation

Clinical features and risk factors of angiography headache and evaluation of its relationship to primary headaches

Turgay Demir, Hasan Bilen Onan, Mehmet Balal, Erol Aksungur, Sebnem Bicakci
DOI: 10.5603/PJNNS.a2019.0058
·
Pubmed: 31755546
·
Neurol Neurochir Pol 2019;53(6):442-448.

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Vol 53, No 6 (2019)
Research paper
Published online: 2019-11-22
Submitted: 2019-07-08
Accepted: 2019-09-30

Abstract

Introduction. Angiography headache is defined as a new headache caused directly by cerebral angiography. We aimed to investigate the prevalence and clinical characteristics of angiography headache, and its relationship with primary headaches.

Material and methods. This single-centre prospective cohort study was carried out in our tertiary healthcare centre. Patients who had undergone a diagnostic cerebral angiography procedure between March 2016 and June 2017 were included in the study. During and after the procedure, we evaluated the patients in terms of occurrence of headache, and, if present, details about time to onset of headache after cerebral angiography, duration of headache, accompanying symptoms (nausea, vomiting, photophobia and phonophobia), and degree and severity of pain.

Results. A total of 226 patients were included in the study. The prevalence of angiography headache was found to be 22.1% (n = 50). While angiography headache started in the first six hours in 92% (n = 46) of the patients, it started after 24 hours of the angiography procedure in only 4% (n = 2). Compressive headache was the most common type, described by 64% of the patients, whereas 4% of the patients described pricking or stabbing sensations. Angiography headache was associated with female gender, higher educational level, and a history of primary headache.

Conclusion. Angiography headache is an important clinical entity that must be considered during and after angiography. Experiencing angiography headache is more common among patients with a history of primary headache.

Abstract

Introduction. Angiography headache is defined as a new headache caused directly by cerebral angiography. We aimed to investigate the prevalence and clinical characteristics of angiography headache, and its relationship with primary headaches.

Material and methods. This single-centre prospective cohort study was carried out in our tertiary healthcare centre. Patients who had undergone a diagnostic cerebral angiography procedure between March 2016 and June 2017 were included in the study. During and after the procedure, we evaluated the patients in terms of occurrence of headache, and, if present, details about time to onset of headache after cerebral angiography, duration of headache, accompanying symptoms (nausea, vomiting, photophobia and phonophobia), and degree and severity of pain.

Results. A total of 226 patients were included in the study. The prevalence of angiography headache was found to be 22.1% (n = 50). While angiography headache started in the first six hours in 92% (n = 46) of the patients, it started after 24 hours of the angiography procedure in only 4% (n = 2). Compressive headache was the most common type, described by 64% of the patients, whereas 4% of the patients described pricking or stabbing sensations. Angiography headache was associated with female gender, higher educational level, and a history of primary headache.

Conclusion. Angiography headache is an important clinical entity that must be considered during and after angiography. Experiencing angiography headache is more common among patients with a history of primary headache.

Get Citation

Keywords

angiography headache, cerebral angiography, clinical characteristics, digital subtraction angiography, primary headache

About this article
Title

Clinical features and risk factors of angiography headache and evaluation of its relationship to primary headaches

Journal

Neurologia i Neurochirurgia Polska

Issue

Vol 53, No 6 (2019)

Pages

442-448

Published online

2019-11-22

DOI

10.5603/PJNNS.a2019.0058

Pubmed

31755546

Bibliographic record

Neurol Neurochir Pol 2019;53(6):442-448.

Keywords

angiography headache
cerebral angiography
clinical characteristics
digital subtraction angiography
primary headache

Authors

Turgay Demir
Hasan Bilen Onan
Mehmet Balal
Erol Aksungur
Sebnem Bicakci

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