open access

Vol 53, No 6 (2019)
Research paper
Published online: 2019-11-14
Submitted: 2019-01-22
Accepted: 2019-09-30
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Assessment of the effects of dysphagia therapy in patients in the early post-stroke period: a randomised controlled trial

Edyta Krajczy, Marcin Krajczy, Jacek Luniewski, Katarzyna Bogacz, Jan Szczegielniak
DOI: 10.5603/PJNNS.a2019.0053
·
Pubmed: 31724147
·
Neurol Neurochir Pol 2019;53(6):428-434.

open access

Vol 53, No 6 (2019)
Research paper
Published online: 2019-11-14
Submitted: 2019-01-22
Accepted: 2019-09-30

Abstract

Aim: This study aimed to evaluate the effects of dysphagia therapy in patients in the early post-stroke period.

Clinical rationale: Dysphagia can be one of the consequences of stroke. This problem often leads to complications in the early stages of stroke, including aspiration pneumonia. Although individual reports on dysphagia exist in the literature, no comprehensive guidelines for dysphagia therapy are available.

Material and methods: This randomised controlled trial included 60 patients with swallowing difficulties after ischaemic stroke (30 each in the study and control groups; age range: 55–65 years) who were admitted to a hospital stroke subunit. Patient rehabilitation period covered 15 days (seven days a week), with therapy for the first 10 days provided during patient hospitalisation and then outpatient physiotherapy during the subsequent five days. The procedure, including providing education about safe food and liquid consumption to patients and their caregivers, was performed in both patient groups. An original dysphagia treatment method was employed in the study group. Statistical average, standard deviation, and statistical error before and after therapy were determined in the study and control groups. The significance of differences in results between the study and control groups was assessed using the Mann–Whitney U test.

Results: The applied therapy for dysphagia improved the swallowing function and selected motor functions of patients after stroke. In the study group, ineffective (delayed) and absent swallowing reflex was observed in 13 patients (44%) before therapy and in one patient (3%) after therapy. The rate of effective swallowing reflex increased from 57% to 97%. Statistically significant differences in swallowing reflex were observed between the study and control groups after therapy (p = 0.00001).

Conclusions: A comprehensive therapy for dysphagia is effective and can reduce serious complications of swallowing disorders in clinical practice.

Clinical implications: The results of this study could improve the clinical treatment of dysphagia.

Abstract

Aim: This study aimed to evaluate the effects of dysphagia therapy in patients in the early post-stroke period.

Clinical rationale: Dysphagia can be one of the consequences of stroke. This problem often leads to complications in the early stages of stroke, including aspiration pneumonia. Although individual reports on dysphagia exist in the literature, no comprehensive guidelines for dysphagia therapy are available.

Material and methods: This randomised controlled trial included 60 patients with swallowing difficulties after ischaemic stroke (30 each in the study and control groups; age range: 55–65 years) who were admitted to a hospital stroke subunit. Patient rehabilitation period covered 15 days (seven days a week), with therapy for the first 10 days provided during patient hospitalisation and then outpatient physiotherapy during the subsequent five days. The procedure, including providing education about safe food and liquid consumption to patients and their caregivers, was performed in both patient groups. An original dysphagia treatment method was employed in the study group. Statistical average, standard deviation, and statistical error before and after therapy were determined in the study and control groups. The significance of differences in results between the study and control groups was assessed using the Mann–Whitney U test.

Results: The applied therapy for dysphagia improved the swallowing function and selected motor functions of patients after stroke. In the study group, ineffective (delayed) and absent swallowing reflex was observed in 13 patients (44%) before therapy and in one patient (3%) after therapy. The rate of effective swallowing reflex increased from 57% to 97%. Statistically significant differences in swallowing reflex were observed between the study and control groups after therapy (p = 0.00001).

Conclusions: A comprehensive therapy for dysphagia is effective and can reduce serious complications of swallowing disorders in clinical practice.

Clinical implications: The results of this study could improve the clinical treatment of dysphagia.

Get Citation

Keywords

dysphagia; swallowing; stroke; physiotherapy; neurology

About this article
Title

Assessment of the effects of dysphagia therapy in patients in the early post-stroke period: a randomised controlled trial

Journal

Neurologia i Neurochirurgia Polska

Issue

Vol 53, No 6 (2019)

Pages

428-434

Published online

2019-11-14

DOI

10.5603/PJNNS.a2019.0053

Pubmed

31724147

Bibliographic record

Neurol Neurochir Pol 2019;53(6):428-434.

Keywords

dysphagia
swallowing
stroke
physiotherapy
neurology

Authors

Edyta Krajczy
Marcin Krajczy
Jacek Luniewski
Katarzyna Bogacz
Jan Szczegielniak

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