Vol 53, No 6 (2019)
Review article
Published online: 2019-11-04
Submitted: 2018-12-07
Accepted: 2019-09-07
Get Citation

Antipsychotic drugs in epilepsy

Natalia Górska, Jakub Słupski, Wiesław J. Cubała
DOI: 10.5603/PJNNS.a2019.0052
·
Pubmed: 31681966
·
Neurol Neurochir Pol 2019;53(6):408-412.

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Vol 53, No 6 (2019)
Review article
Published online: 2019-11-04
Submitted: 2018-12-07
Accepted: 2019-09-07

Abstract

The prevalence of various psychiatric disorders in people with epilepsy is high, with psychoses affecting 2–9% of patients. Antipsychotic drugs have been identified as increasing the risk of epileptic seizures. For first-generation antipsychotics such a risk appears to be relatively low, with the exception of chlorpromazine. Among second-generation antipsychotics, clozapine use carries the highest risk of seizure induction, while risperidone, quetiapine, amisulpride, and aripiprazole seem to pose a significantly lower risk. The incidence of an increased number of seizures is linked to the elevated blood plasma level effect of antipsychotics. To diminish the risk of seizures, it is important to start with a small dose of antipsychotic drug, to titrate slowly, to monitor serum levels of prescribed drugs, and to keep the drug at the minimal effective dose.

Abstract

The prevalence of various psychiatric disorders in people with epilepsy is high, with psychoses affecting 2–9% of patients. Antipsychotic drugs have been identified as increasing the risk of epileptic seizures. For first-generation antipsychotics such a risk appears to be relatively low, with the exception of chlorpromazine. Among second-generation antipsychotics, clozapine use carries the highest risk of seizure induction, while risperidone, quetiapine, amisulpride, and aripiprazole seem to pose a significantly lower risk. The incidence of an increased number of seizures is linked to the elevated blood plasma level effect of antipsychotics. To diminish the risk of seizures, it is important to start with a small dose of antipsychotic drug, to titrate slowly, to monitor serum levels of prescribed drugs, and to keep the drug at the minimal effective dose.

Get Citation

Keywords

antipsychotic drugs, epilepsy, psychosis

About this article
Title

Antipsychotic drugs in epilepsy

Journal

Neurologia i Neurochirurgia Polska

Issue

Vol 53, No 6 (2019)

Pages

408-412

Published online

2019-11-04

DOI

10.5603/PJNNS.a2019.0052

Pubmed

31681966

Bibliographic record

Neurol Neurochir Pol 2019;53(6):408-412.

Keywords

antipsychotic drugs
epilepsy
psychosis

Authors

Natalia Górska
Jakub Słupski
Wiesław J. Cubała

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