open access

Vol 53, No 5 (2019)
Research paper
Published online: 2019-10-08
Submitted: 2019-04-28
Accepted: 2019-09-07
Get Citation

Migraine headache facilitators in a population of Polish women and their association with migraine occurrence — preliminary results

Piotr Chądzyński, Aleksandra Kacprzak, Wojciech Domitrz, Izabela Domitrz
DOI: 10.5603/PJNNS.a2019.0044
·
Pubmed: 31592536
·
Neurol Neurochir Pol 2019;53(5):377-383.

open access

Vol 53, No 5 (2019)
Research paper
Published online: 2019-10-08
Submitted: 2019-04-28
Accepted: 2019-09-07

Abstract

Aim of the study. The occurrence of migraine is linked with some common lifestyle activities and conditions preceding the attack. Our study presents known and presumptive lifestyle factors and activities related to migraine, and compares them to the frequency of headache attacks.

Material and methods. 40 female patients of the Headache Outpatient Clinic in Warsaw, Poland, diagnosed with migraine, mean age 44.6 years, and 40 female participants from the control group, mean age 39.5 years, were included in the study. The study employed questionnaires reporting the presence of lifestyle factors and socioeconomic predispositions as well as the Migraine Disability Assessment Test (MIDAS) as data collection methods.

Results. Correlations between some of the lifestyle factors and the frequency of migraines occurred statistically significantly.

Conclusions. Some factors and lifestyle activities such as stress, relaxation, specific dietary products, fasting, fatigue, bright light, noise, weather changes or menstruation may have an influence on migraine frequency and severity in female patients, which can have an impact on migraine prevention.

Abstract

Aim of the study. The occurrence of migraine is linked with some common lifestyle activities and conditions preceding the attack. Our study presents known and presumptive lifestyle factors and activities related to migraine, and compares them to the frequency of headache attacks.

Material and methods. 40 female patients of the Headache Outpatient Clinic in Warsaw, Poland, diagnosed with migraine, mean age 44.6 years, and 40 female participants from the control group, mean age 39.5 years, were included in the study. The study employed questionnaires reporting the presence of lifestyle factors and socioeconomic predispositions as well as the Migraine Disability Assessment Test (MIDAS) as data collection methods.

Results. Correlations between some of the lifestyle factors and the frequency of migraines occurred statistically significantly.

Conclusions. Some factors and lifestyle activities such as stress, relaxation, specific dietary products, fasting, fatigue, bright light, noise, weather changes or menstruation may have an influence on migraine frequency and severity in female patients, which can have an impact on migraine prevention.

Get Citation

Keywords

migraine, trigger factors, lifestyle, headaches

About this article
Title

Migraine headache facilitators in a population of Polish women and their association with migraine occurrence — preliminary results

Journal

Neurologia i Neurochirurgia Polska

Issue

Vol 53, No 5 (2019)

Pages

377-383

Published online

2019-10-08

DOI

10.5603/PJNNS.a2019.0044

Pubmed

31592536

Bibliographic record

Neurol Neurochir Pol 2019;53(5):377-383.

Keywords

migraine
trigger factors
lifestyle
headaches

Authors

Piotr Chądzyński
Aleksandra Kacprzak
Wojciech Domitrz
Izabela Domitrz

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