open access

Vol 53, No 4 (2019)
Research paper
Published online: 2019-08-22
Submitted: 2019-03-02
Accepted: 2019-05-01
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Epidemiological analysis of hospitalisations due to recurrent stroke in the Silesian Province, Poland, between 2009 and 2015

Beata Łabuz-Roszak, Michał Skrzypek, Anna Starostka-Tatar, Anetta Lasek-Bal, Mariusz Gąsior, Marek Gierlotka
DOI: 10.5603/PJNNS.a2019.0034
·
Pubmed: 31441494
·
Neurol Neurochir Pol 2019;53(4):277-290.

open access

Vol 53, No 4 (2019)
Research paper
Published online: 2019-08-22
Submitted: 2019-03-02
Accepted: 2019-05-01

Abstract

Background and aim. There is a lack of recent epidemiological studies on recurrent stroke (RS) in Poland. The aim of this study was to analyse all hospitalisations related to RS in Silesia – an industrial region covering 12% of the Polish population.

Material and methods. We carried out statistical analysis of data contained in stroke questionnaires transferred to the Polish National Health Fund by hospitals in Silesia, Poland, between 2009 and 2015.

Results. In the analysed period, the number of RS hospitalisations in Silesia was 18,063 (22.2% of all acute strokes). The percentage of RS significantly decreased during the period under consideration (p < 0.001). The same observation concerned recurrent ischaemic stroke (RIS), but not recurrent haemorrhagic stroke (RHS). The median hospitalisation time was 14 days for RHS, and 11 days for RIS. Large-artery atherosclerosis and cardioembolisms were significantly more often recognised in RIS than in first-ever ischaemic stroke (FIS) (consecutively, 38.2% vs 36.0%, and 21% vs 18.1%; p < 0.001). The in-hospital mortality rate was significantly higher for RS than for first-ever stroke (18.4% vs 17.2%; p < 0.001). The same observation was
done for RIS vs FIS (16.2% vs 13.9%; p < 0.001), and for RHS vs FHS (39.8% vs 36%; p = 0.004). The rtPA therapy was applied to 5.3% of FIS and 3.2% of RIS patients (p < 0.001).

Conclusions. This is the first such comprehensive and long-term analysis of recurrent stroke in Silesia, Poland. It could help in the implementation of appropriate educational programmes, and thus help to improve the health status of society.

Abstract

Background and aim. There is a lack of recent epidemiological studies on recurrent stroke (RS) in Poland. The aim of this study was to analyse all hospitalisations related to RS in Silesia – an industrial region covering 12% of the Polish population.

Material and methods. We carried out statistical analysis of data contained in stroke questionnaires transferred to the Polish National Health Fund by hospitals in Silesia, Poland, between 2009 and 2015.

Results. In the analysed period, the number of RS hospitalisations in Silesia was 18,063 (22.2% of all acute strokes). The percentage of RS significantly decreased during the period under consideration (p < 0.001). The same observation concerned recurrent ischaemic stroke (RIS), but not recurrent haemorrhagic stroke (RHS). The median hospitalisation time was 14 days for RHS, and 11 days for RIS. Large-artery atherosclerosis and cardioembolisms were significantly more often recognised in RIS than in first-ever ischaemic stroke (FIS) (consecutively, 38.2% vs 36.0%, and 21% vs 18.1%; p < 0.001). The in-hospital mortality rate was significantly higher for RS than for first-ever stroke (18.4% vs 17.2%; p < 0.001). The same observation was
done for RIS vs FIS (16.2% vs 13.9%; p < 0.001), and for RHS vs FHS (39.8% vs 36%; p = 0.004). The rtPA therapy was applied to 5.3% of FIS and 3.2% of RIS patients (p < 0.001).

Conclusions. This is the first such comprehensive and long-term analysis of recurrent stroke in Silesia, Poland. It could help in the implementation of appropriate educational programmes, and thus help to improve the health status of society.

Get Citation

Keywords

stroke, epidemiology, ischaemic stroke, haemorrhagic stroke, recurrent stroke

About this article
Title

Epidemiological analysis of hospitalisations due to recurrent stroke in the Silesian Province, Poland, between 2009 and 2015

Journal

Neurologia i Neurochirurgia Polska

Issue

Vol 53, No 4 (2019)

Pages

277-290

Published online

2019-08-22

DOI

10.5603/PJNNS.a2019.0034

Pubmed

31441494

Bibliographic record

Neurol Neurochir Pol 2019;53(4):277-290.

Keywords

stroke
epidemiology
ischaemic stroke
haemorrhagic stroke
recurrent stroke

Authors

Beata Łabuz-Roszak
Michał Skrzypek
Anna Starostka-Tatar
Anetta Lasek-Bal
Mariusz Gąsior
Marek Gierlotka

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