Vol 53, No 3 (2019)
Research paper
Published online: 2019-06-04
Submitted: 2018-11-29
Accepted: 2019-05-13
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Seasonal variations in the occurrence of transient global amnesia (TGA)

Justyna Chojdak-Łukasiewicz, Edyta Dziadkowiak, Leszek Noga, Małgorzata Wieczorek, Bogusław Paradowski
DOI: 10.5603/PJNNS.a2019.0021
·
Pubmed: 31162624
·
Neurol Neurochir Pol 2019;53(3):212-216.

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Vol 53, No 3 (2019)
Research paper
Published online: 2019-06-04
Submitted: 2018-11-29
Accepted: 2019-05-13

Abstract

Background. Transient global amnesia (TGA) is a rare, benign condition characterised by a sudden deficit of anterograde and retrograde memory that usually lasts for a few hours and is not accompanied by other focal neurological symptoms or signs. Its aetiology is still unclear. Various events or activities may trigger TGA. Evidence of seasonal variations in the appearance of TGA is inconsistent.

Methods. We retrospectively analysed the medical history of 114 adult patients with diagnosed TGA, hospitalised at two neurology departments in Wrocław from 2008 to 2014. We reviewed risk factors, trigger points, and occurrence in each month of the year in our patient population.

Results. Over this seven-year period, 114 patients were diagnosed with TGA. The annual occurrence ranged from 13 to 22 hospitalisations. The mean age of the patients was 64 years. There were 36 TGA events in men and 78 in women. TGA occurred most frequently in spring (36%) and summer (30%), with the incidence peaking during March.

Conclusions. Our findings suggest that there is a relationship between the season of the year and the probability of TGA.

Abstract

Background. Transient global amnesia (TGA) is a rare, benign condition characterised by a sudden deficit of anterograde and retrograde memory that usually lasts for a few hours and is not accompanied by other focal neurological symptoms or signs. Its aetiology is still unclear. Various events or activities may trigger TGA. Evidence of seasonal variations in the appearance of TGA is inconsistent.

Methods. We retrospectively analysed the medical history of 114 adult patients with diagnosed TGA, hospitalised at two neurology departments in Wrocław from 2008 to 2014. We reviewed risk factors, trigger points, and occurrence in each month of the year in our patient population.

Results. Over this seven-year period, 114 patients were diagnosed with TGA. The annual occurrence ranged from 13 to 22 hospitalisations. The mean age of the patients was 64 years. There were 36 TGA events in men and 78 in women. TGA occurred most frequently in spring (36%) and summer (30%), with the incidence peaking during March.

Conclusions. Our findings suggest that there is a relationship between the season of the year and the probability of TGA.

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Keywords

transient global amnesia, seasonal variations

About this article
Title

Seasonal variations in the occurrence of transient global amnesia (TGA)

Journal

Neurologia i Neurochirurgia Polska

Issue

Vol 53, No 3 (2019)

Pages

212-216

Published online

2019-06-04

DOI

10.5603/PJNNS.a2019.0021

Pubmed

31162624

Bibliographic record

Neurol Neurochir Pol 2019;53(3):212-216.

Keywords

transient global amnesia
seasonal variations

Authors

Justyna Chojdak-Łukasiewicz
Edyta Dziadkowiak
Leszek Noga
Małgorzata Wieczorek
Bogusław Paradowski

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