Vol 54, No 2 (2020)
Research paper
Published online: 2020-04-08
Submitted: 2019-06-04
Accepted: 2020-03-13
Get Citation

Symmetry and interhemispheric propagation of paediatric photoparoxysmal response

Tymon Skadorwa, Jolanta Strzelecka
DOI: 10.5603/PJNNS.a2020.0030
·
Pubmed: 32266948
·
Neurol Neurochir Pol 2020;54(2):193-199.

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Vol 54, No 2 (2020)
Research paper
Published online: 2020-04-08
Submitted: 2019-06-04
Accepted: 2020-03-13

Abstract

Aim of the study. To investigate the speculated interhemispheric symmetry and the pattern of propagation of paediatric photoparoxysmal response.

Clinical rationale for the study. Quantitative analysis of the photoparoxysmal response (PPR) to intermittent photic stimulation is a promising method of assessing photosensitivity (PS). The pattern of PPR propagation underlies the model used for calculations. The generalisation of a discharge should correspond with the parameters objectively characterising the PPR in both cerebral hemispheres. However, to date no evidence of a postulated symmetry has been demonstrated.

Materials and methods. Our analysis was performed by comparing the EEG amplitude and interhemispheric coherence (ICoh) in both hemispheres in 100 non-epileptic individuals of both sexes, aged 5–18 years, with PS grade IV (the PPR group) and without PS (the control group). The amplitude and ICoh values were recorded and analysed statistically.

Results. The distribution of amplitude values between the hemispheres was comparable in both groups, but was significantly different between the PPR group and the control group. Individual tracks of propagation revealed hemispheric symmetry. Interhemispheric coherence values were significantly higher in occipital, temporal and fronto-polar areas in children with PS.

Conclusions and clinical implications. This study provides objective evidence of interhemispheric symmetry in paediatric PPR, which supports the link with generalised seizures. Interhemispheric propagation is facilitated in children with PS, and propagation is more likely in the occipital and temporal regions.

Abstract

Aim of the study. To investigate the speculated interhemispheric symmetry and the pattern of propagation of paediatric photoparoxysmal response.

Clinical rationale for the study. Quantitative analysis of the photoparoxysmal response (PPR) to intermittent photic stimulation is a promising method of assessing photosensitivity (PS). The pattern of PPR propagation underlies the model used for calculations. The generalisation of a discharge should correspond with the parameters objectively characterising the PPR in both cerebral hemispheres. However, to date no evidence of a postulated symmetry has been demonstrated.

Materials and methods. Our analysis was performed by comparing the EEG amplitude and interhemispheric coherence (ICoh) in both hemispheres in 100 non-epileptic individuals of both sexes, aged 5–18 years, with PS grade IV (the PPR group) and without PS (the control group). The amplitude and ICoh values were recorded and analysed statistically.

Results. The distribution of amplitude values between the hemispheres was comparable in both groups, but was significantly different between the PPR group and the control group. Individual tracks of propagation revealed hemispheric symmetry. Interhemispheric coherence values were significantly higher in occipital, temporal and fronto-polar areas in children with PS.

Conclusions and clinical implications. This study provides objective evidence of interhemispheric symmetry in paediatric PPR, which supports the link with generalised seizures. Interhemispheric propagation is facilitated in children with PS, and propagation is more likely in the occipital and temporal regions.

Get Citation

Keywords

photoparoxysmal response, photosensitivity, interhemispheric symmetry, interhemispheric coherence

About this article
Title

Symmetry and interhemispheric propagation of paediatric photoparoxysmal response

Journal

Neurologia i Neurochirurgia Polska

Issue

Vol 54, No 2 (2020)

Pages

193-199

Published online

2020-04-08

DOI

10.5603/PJNNS.a2020.0030

Pubmed

32266948

Bibliographic record

Neurol Neurochir Pol 2020;54(2):193-199.

Keywords

photoparoxysmal response
photosensitivity
interhemispheric symmetry
interhemispheric coherence

Authors

Tymon Skadorwa
Jolanta Strzelecka

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