open access

Vol 48, No 6 (2014)
Review article
Submitted: 2014-07-21
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Huntington Disease – Principles and practice of nutritional management

Wioletta Żukiewicz-Sobczak, Renata Król, Paula Wróblewska, Jacek Piątek, Magdalena Gibas-Dorna
DOI: 10.1016/j.pjnns.2014.10.006
·
Neurol Neurochir Pol 2014;48(6):442-448.

open access

Vol 48, No 6 (2014)
Review article
Submitted: 2014-07-21

Abstract

Huntington disease (HD) is a degenerative brain disease clinically manifested by the characteristic triad: physical symptoms including involuntary movements and poor coordination, cognitive changes with less ability to organize routine tasks, and some emotional and behavioral disturbances. For patients with HD, feeding is one of the problems they have to face. People with HD often have lower than average body weight and struggle with malnutrition. As a part of therapy, good nutrition is an intervention maintaining health and functional ability for maximally prolonged time. In the early stages of HD, small amounts of blenderized foods given orally are recommended. In more advanced stages, enteral nutrition is essential using gastric, or jejunal tubes for short term. Most severe cases require gastrostomy or gastrojejunostomy. Although enteral feeding is well tolerated by most of the patients, a number of complications may occur, including damage to the nose, pharynx, or esophagus, aspiration pneumonia, sinusitis, metabolic imbalances due to improper nutrient and fluid supply, adverse effects affecting gastrointestinal system, and refeeding syndrome.

Abstract

Huntington disease (HD) is a degenerative brain disease clinically manifested by the characteristic triad: physical symptoms including involuntary movements and poor coordination, cognitive changes with less ability to organize routine tasks, and some emotional and behavioral disturbances. For patients with HD, feeding is one of the problems they have to face. People with HD often have lower than average body weight and struggle with malnutrition. As a part of therapy, good nutrition is an intervention maintaining health and functional ability for maximally prolonged time. In the early stages of HD, small amounts of blenderized foods given orally are recommended. In more advanced stages, enteral nutrition is essential using gastric, or jejunal tubes for short term. Most severe cases require gastrostomy or gastrojejunostomy. Although enteral feeding is well tolerated by most of the patients, a number of complications may occur, including damage to the nose, pharynx, or esophagus, aspiration pneumonia, sinusitis, metabolic imbalances due to improper nutrient and fluid supply, adverse effects affecting gastrointestinal system, and refeeding syndrome.

Get Citation

Keywords

Huntington disease, Dysphagia, Malnutrition, Enteral nutrition

About this article
Title

Huntington Disease – Principles and practice of nutritional management

Journal

Neurologia i Neurochirurgia Polska

Issue

Vol 48, No 6 (2014)

Pages

442-448

DOI

10.1016/j.pjnns.2014.10.006

Bibliographic record

Neurol Neurochir Pol 2014;48(6):442-448.

Keywords

Huntington disease
Dysphagia
Malnutrition
Enteral nutrition

Authors

Wioletta Żukiewicz-Sobczak
Renata Król
Paula Wróblewska
Jacek Piątek
Magdalena Gibas-Dorna

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