open access

Vol 12, No 3 (2019)
Review paper
Published online: 2019-11-28
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Pathogen inactivation method with UVC

Elżbieta Lachert
Journal of Transfusion Medicine 2019;12(3):77-82.

open access

Vol 12, No 3 (2019)
REVIEWS
Published online: 2019-11-28

Abstract

At the end of the 1990s many countries started implementing pathogen inactivation methods for blood components dedicated for clinical use into routine work of blood transfusion facilities. A chemical — solvent detergent — method was developed as well as methods based on photochemical and photodynamic reactions with methylene blue, amotosalene hydrochloride and riboflavin. Although removal processes are used blood components subjected to inactivation with the above methods still contain traces of chemical compounds (the exception here is the riboflavin method). Attempts were therefore made to develop an inactivation method with no chemicals, based only on appropriate wavelength illumination. Theraflex UV Platelets system is the example of such inactivation method for platelet concentrates (PCs) based on UVC, with no photosensitizing compound. Therflex UV system makes use of 254 nm wavelength radiation, which is not absorbed by proteins, so there is no need for conventional toxicity tests. The method is effective for clinically significant G (+) and G (–) bacteria as well as viruses and protozoa. Clinical trials demonstrated reduced recovery of platelets inactivated by UVC and reduced survival time in the recipient’s organism.

Abstract

At the end of the 1990s many countries started implementing pathogen inactivation methods for blood components dedicated for clinical use into routine work of blood transfusion facilities. A chemical — solvent detergent — method was developed as well as methods based on photochemical and photodynamic reactions with methylene blue, amotosalene hydrochloride and riboflavin. Although removal processes are used blood components subjected to inactivation with the above methods still contain traces of chemical compounds (the exception here is the riboflavin method). Attempts were therefore made to develop an inactivation method with no chemicals, based only on appropriate wavelength illumination. Theraflex UV Platelets system is the example of such inactivation method for platelet concentrates (PCs) based on UVC, with no photosensitizing compound. Therflex UV system makes use of 254 nm wavelength radiation, which is not absorbed by proteins, so there is no need for conventional toxicity tests. The method is effective for clinically significant G (+) and G (–) bacteria as well as viruses and protozoa. Clinical trials demonstrated reduced recovery of platelets inactivated by UVC and reduced survival time in the recipient’s organism.
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Keywords

pathogen inactivation; UVC illumination; platelet concentrate

About this article
Title

Pathogen inactivation method with UVC

Journal

Journal of Transfusion Medicine

Issue

Vol 12, No 3 (2019)

Article type

Review paper

Pages

77-82

Published online

2019-11-28

Bibliographic record

Journal of Transfusion Medicine 2019;12(3):77-82.

Keywords

pathogen inactivation
UVC illumination
platelet concentrate

Authors

Elżbieta Lachert

References (22)
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