open access

Vol 11, No 4 (2018)
Research paper
Published online: 2019-03-12
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Response Rate of Sero-reactive Blood Donors to Notification and Counselling

Manish Raturi, Shamee Shastry, Pruthvi Raj
Journal of Transfusion Medicine 2018;11(4):144-150.

open access

Vol 11, No 4 (2018)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2019-03-12

Abstract

Background. Sero-reactivity disclosure to blood donors is an important issue of public domain. The sensitivity of situation demands both confidential as well as trust laden atmosphere while notifying them. Our aim was to assess and analyze the response rate of sero-reactive donors towards post-donation notification and counselling.
Material and methods. Donors reactive for any transfusion transmitted infections were notified of their results and called to blood bank for counseling (January 2016 to December 2017). The notification process included one postal and two telephonic communications. Their privacy was maintained throughout the whole process. Responders were counseled by the medical officer and subsequently referred to the concerned specialty for further management.
Results. Among 30,343 voluntary blood donors (96% males) 65.2% (n = 19 784) were repeat donors. Total 0.42% (n = 129) cases with reactive screening test results (0.30% HBV; 0.06% HIV; 0.006% HCV; 0.04% syphilis and 0.006% malaria) were evaluated. Prevalence of HBV and HIV were higher among first time donors (0.61% and 0.12%) than in repeat donors (0.14% and 0.02%) respectively (p = 0.002). Overall 58% (n = 75/129) donors responded to notification and counseling. Response among repeat donors (67.5% [n = 27/40]) versus first time donors (54.0% [n = 48/89]) was better and statistically significant (p = 0.05). The response rate for Malaria, HIV, Syphilis, HBV and HCV was 100%, 78%, 77%, 51% and 50%, respectively. Inaccurate donor demographics (wrong address and phone number) resulted in our inability to notify 11.6% (n = 15) cases. Major factors hindering the response rate were donors’ inability to be present for a post-test discussion either due to far distance (> 100 miles) and/or their busy schedule.
Conclusion. Good response was noted among repeat blood donors. Donor education and repeated attempts to communicate with the sero-reactive donors would improve the response rate.

Abstract

Background. Sero-reactivity disclosure to blood donors is an important issue of public domain. The sensitivity of situation demands both confidential as well as trust laden atmosphere while notifying them. Our aim was to assess and analyze the response rate of sero-reactive donors towards post-donation notification and counselling.
Material and methods. Donors reactive for any transfusion transmitted infections were notified of their results and called to blood bank for counseling (January 2016 to December 2017). The notification process included one postal and two telephonic communications. Their privacy was maintained throughout the whole process. Responders were counseled by the medical officer and subsequently referred to the concerned specialty for further management.
Results. Among 30,343 voluntary blood donors (96% males) 65.2% (n = 19 784) were repeat donors. Total 0.42% (n = 129) cases with reactive screening test results (0.30% HBV; 0.06% HIV; 0.006% HCV; 0.04% syphilis and 0.006% malaria) were evaluated. Prevalence of HBV and HIV were higher among first time donors (0.61% and 0.12%) than in repeat donors (0.14% and 0.02%) respectively (p = 0.002). Overall 58% (n = 75/129) donors responded to notification and counseling. Response among repeat donors (67.5% [n = 27/40]) versus first time donors (54.0% [n = 48/89]) was better and statistically significant (p = 0.05). The response rate for Malaria, HIV, Syphilis, HBV and HCV was 100%, 78%, 77%, 51% and 50%, respectively. Inaccurate donor demographics (wrong address and phone number) resulted in our inability to notify 11.6% (n = 15) cases. Major factors hindering the response rate were donors’ inability to be present for a post-test discussion either due to far distance (> 100 miles) and/or their busy schedule.
Conclusion. Good response was noted among repeat blood donors. Donor education and repeated attempts to communicate with the sero-reactive donors would improve the response rate.

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Keywords

Blood donor notification; transfusion transmitted infections; post-test discussion

About this article
Title

Response Rate of Sero-reactive Blood Donors to Notification and Counselling

Journal

Journal of Transfusion Medicine

Issue

Vol 11, No 4 (2018)

Article type

Research paper

Pages

144-150

Published online

2019-03-12

Bibliographic record

Journal of Transfusion Medicine 2018;11(4):144-150.

Keywords

Blood donor notification
transfusion transmitted infections
post-test discussion

Authors

Manish Raturi
Shamee Shastry
Pruthvi Raj

References (11)
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  8. Roshan TM, Rosline H, Ahmed SA, et al. Response rate of Malaysian blood donors with reactive screening test to transfusion medicine unit calls. Southeast Asian J Trop Med Public Health. 2009; 40(6): 1315–1321.
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