open access

Vol 10, No 2 (2017)
Review paper
Published online: 2017-07-05
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Blood protozoal parasites as potential threat to blood safety

Edward Siński
Journal of Transfusion Medicine 2017;10(2):67-72.

open access

Vol 10, No 2 (2017)
REVIEWS
Published online: 2017-07-05

Abstract

The study objective was evaluation of the protozoal parasite infection risk (malaria, Chagas disease, leishmaniosis and babesiosis) in relation to blood transfusion safety. These protozoal parasitic diseases are mostly transmitted by arthropod vectors, but also vertically through transfusion of blood and blood components. All with the exception of babesiosis, are endemic mostly in tropical countries and effect millions of people, both inhabitants of endemic regions, travelers to such endemic areas as well as autochthons migrating from these areas. In most European countries prevention of disease transmission through blood transfusion relies mainly on restrictive donor selection (questionnaires, serological and molecular biology tests) and deferral of infected or seropositive donors. In transfusion medicine the overall loss of blood due to these diseases is substantial. In Poland “imported” diseases such as malaria, Chagas disease and leishmaniosis are very rare and are no serious threat to blood safety. However, blood donors should be screened for Babesia infections, especially in some north-eastern regions of the country where human babesiosis is already documented. This could have relevant impact on blood safety but as yet no adequate procedures have been implemented.

Abstract

The study objective was evaluation of the protozoal parasite infection risk (malaria, Chagas disease, leishmaniosis and babesiosis) in relation to blood transfusion safety. These protozoal parasitic diseases are mostly transmitted by arthropod vectors, but also vertically through transfusion of blood and blood components. All with the exception of babesiosis, are endemic mostly in tropical countries and effect millions of people, both inhabitants of endemic regions, travelers to such endemic areas as well as autochthons migrating from these areas. In most European countries prevention of disease transmission through blood transfusion relies mainly on restrictive donor selection (questionnaires, serological and molecular biology tests) and deferral of infected or seropositive donors. In transfusion medicine the overall loss of blood due to these diseases is substantial. In Poland “imported” diseases such as malaria, Chagas disease and leishmaniosis are very rare and are no serious threat to blood safety. However, blood donors should be screened for Babesia infections, especially in some north-eastern regions of the country where human babesiosis is already documented. This could have relevant impact on blood safety but as yet no adequate procedures have been implemented.

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Keywords

blood parasites; malaria; Chagas disease; leishmaniosis; babesiosis; transfusion-related risk

About this article
Title

Blood protozoal parasites as potential threat to blood safety

Journal

Journal of Transfusion Medicine

Issue

Vol 10, No 2 (2017)

Article type

Review paper

Pages

67-72

Published online

2017-07-05

Bibliographic record

Journal of Transfusion Medicine 2017;10(2):67-72.

Keywords

blood parasites
malaria
Chagas disease
leishmaniosis
babesiosis
transfusion-related risk

Authors

Edward Siński

References (20)
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