open access

Vol 10, No 2 (2017)
Review paper
Published online: 2017-07-05
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Clinical significance of West Nile Virus infection in the light of reports from the Conference “The current problems concerning bloodborne pathogens” (10 March, 2017, Warsaw)

Sławomir Pancewicz, Justyna Dunaj, Piotr Czupryna, Anna Moniuszko-Malinowska
Journal of Transfusion Medicine 2017;10(2):63-66.

open access

Vol 10, No 2 (2017)
REVIEWS
Published online: 2017-07-05

Abstract

West Nile Virus (WNV) is a RNA virus belonging to the Flaviviridae family. It is the most widespread
virus in the world. Culex mosquitoes are vectors of this virus, while birds inhabiting humid areas are the reservoir. The paper presents epidemiological data, the clinical picture, diagnostic methods and treatment of West Nile fever. Special emphasis was put on prevention, especially in pregnant women.

Abstract

West Nile Virus (WNV) is a RNA virus belonging to the Flaviviridae family. It is the most widespread
virus in the world. Culex mosquitoes are vectors of this virus, while birds inhabiting humid areas are the reservoir. The paper presents epidemiological data, the clinical picture, diagnostic methods and treatment of West Nile fever. Special emphasis was put on prevention, especially in pregnant women.

Get Citation

Keywords

West Nile fever; epidemiology; clinical picture; prophylaxis

About this article
Title

Clinical significance of West Nile Virus infection in the light of reports from the Conference “The current problems concerning bloodborne pathogens” (10 March, 2017, Warsaw)

Journal

Journal of Transfusion Medicine

Issue

Vol 10, No 2 (2017)

Article type

Review paper

Pages

63-66

Published online

2017-07-05

Bibliographic record

Journal of Transfusion Medicine 2017;10(2):63-66.

Keywords

West Nile fever
epidemiology
clinical picture
prophylaxis

Authors

Sławomir Pancewicz
Justyna Dunaj
Piotr Czupryna
Anna Moniuszko-Malinowska

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