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Vol 2, No 3 (2009)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2009-06-22
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One-year experience of nucleic acid technology testing for human immunodeficiency virus Type 1, hepatitis C virus, and hepatitis B virus in Thai blood donations

Soisaang Phikulsod, Sineenart Oota, Thaweesak Tirawatnapong, Tasanee Sakuldamrongpanich, Wilai Chalermchan, Suda Louisirirotchanakul, Srivilai Tanprasert, Viroje Chongkolwatana, Pimpun Kitpoka, Praphan Phanuphak, Chantapong Wasi, Chaivej Nuchprayoon oraz Grupa Robocza d Krwiodawstwie
Journal of Transfusion Medicine 2009;2(3):137-149.

open access

Vol 2, No 3 (2009)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2009-06-22

Abstract

Background: Blood donations collected at the National Blood Center, the Thai Red Cross Society, Bangkok, in 2007 were tested by nucleic acid amplification technology (NAT) using the Chiron TIGRIS/Procleix Ultrio test and the Roche cobas s 201/cobas TaqScreen multiplex test.
Material and methods: The sensitivity, specificity, and robustness were determined by testing 486 676 seronegative blood donations. Samples from each day of collection were divided into two sets; the odd-numbered samples were tested individually on the TIGRIS and the evennumbered samples were tested in pools of 6 on the cobas s 201. The status of reactive samples was confirmed by duplicate testing of samples from the plasma bag to calculate the test specificity. Reactive samples were tested on the alternate system and followed up.
Results: The analytical sensitivity of both systems met the 95% limits of detection claimed by the respective package inserts. No cross contamination was seen with either system. Test specificity was 99.93 and 99.90% for the Procleix Ultrio and cobas TaqScreen tests, respectively. The NAT yield rates for human immunodeficiency virus Type 1 (HIV-1), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and hepatitis B virus (HBV) were 1:97 000, 1:490 000, and 1:2800, respectively. Several occult HBV donors, the majority of whom were detected by both tests, were also identified. The HIV-1 and HCV window cases were detected with both tests.
Conclusion: The performances of the systems and tests indicated that both were acceptable for routine NAT by the National Blood Center, the Thai Red Cross Society. However, the Procleix Ultrio test appeared to be less sensitive than the cobas TaqScreen test for HBV.

Abstract

Background: Blood donations collected at the National Blood Center, the Thai Red Cross Society, Bangkok, in 2007 were tested by nucleic acid amplification technology (NAT) using the Chiron TIGRIS/Procleix Ultrio test and the Roche cobas s 201/cobas TaqScreen multiplex test.
Material and methods: The sensitivity, specificity, and robustness were determined by testing 486 676 seronegative blood donations. Samples from each day of collection were divided into two sets; the odd-numbered samples were tested individually on the TIGRIS and the evennumbered samples were tested in pools of 6 on the cobas s 201. The status of reactive samples was confirmed by duplicate testing of samples from the plasma bag to calculate the test specificity. Reactive samples were tested on the alternate system and followed up.
Results: The analytical sensitivity of both systems met the 95% limits of detection claimed by the respective package inserts. No cross contamination was seen with either system. Test specificity was 99.93 and 99.90% for the Procleix Ultrio and cobas TaqScreen tests, respectively. The NAT yield rates for human immunodeficiency virus Type 1 (HIV-1), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and hepatitis B virus (HBV) were 1:97 000, 1:490 000, and 1:2800, respectively. Several occult HBV donors, the majority of whom were detected by both tests, were also identified. The HIV-1 and HCV window cases were detected with both tests.
Conclusion: The performances of the systems and tests indicated that both were acceptable for routine NAT by the National Blood Center, the Thai Red Cross Society. However, the Procleix Ultrio test appeared to be less sensitive than the cobas TaqScreen test for HBV.
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Keywords

individual donation (ID); minipools (MPs); multiplex (MPX); West Nile virus (WNV)

About this article
Title

One-year experience of nucleic acid technology testing for human immunodeficiency virus Type 1, hepatitis C virus, and hepatitis B virus in Thai blood donations

Journal

Journal of Transfusion Medicine

Issue

Vol 2, No 3 (2009)

Pages

137-149

Published online

2009-06-22

Bibliographic record

Journal of Transfusion Medicine 2009;2(3):137-149.

Keywords

individual donation (ID)
minipools (MPs)
multiplex (MPX)
West Nile virus (WNV)

Authors

Soisaang Phikulsod
Sineenart Oota
Thaweesak Tirawatnapong
Tasanee Sakuldamrongpanich
Wilai Chalermchan
Suda Louisirirotchanakul
Srivilai Tanprasert
Viroje Chongkolwatana
Pimpun Kitpoka
Praphan Phanuphak
Chantapong Wasi
Chaivej Nuchprayoon oraz Grupa Robocza d Krwiodawstwie

References (24)
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