open access

Vol 70, No 2 (2019)
MARITIME MEDICINE Original articles
Published online: 2019-06-25
Submitted: 2018-03-29
Accepted: 2019-03-19
Get Citation

Don’t forget about seafarer’s boredom

Dominique Jegaden, Myriam Menaheze, David Lucas, Brice Loddé, Jean-Dominique Dewitte
DOI: 10.5603/IMH.2019.0013
·
Pubmed: 31237666
·
International Maritime Health 2019;70(2):82-87.

open access

Vol 70, No 2 (2019)
MARITIME MEDICINE Original articles
Published online: 2019-06-25
Submitted: 2018-03-29
Accepted: 2019-03-19

Abstract

Background: The question we asked was whether it is worthwhile screening for seafarers who are prone to boredom, and whose mental health might deteriorate on board because of the particular character of life at sea.

Materials and methods: We used the Farmer and Sundberg Boredom Proneness Scale (BPS), validated in French, as well as the Zigmond and Snaith Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). The survey was voluntary and responses were collected by means of questionnaires which were returned by post. 

Results: Eighty seafarers (40 officers and 40 crew) as well as 63 office staff from the same shipping company were included in the survey. We found a significant difference between officers and operational personnel: average score of 8.4 ± 5 (median = 7) for officers and 10.2 ± 4.8 (median = 10) for operational personnel. 21% of the officers have scores greater than or equal to 12 compared with 41% of the crew. There is a significant correlation between the BPS and HADS test scores, in terms of depression, for the office staff and the seafarers taken as a whole; this correlation being highly significant among officers (r = +0.85), but only marginally significant among crew members (r = +0.54). 

Conclusions: The BPS may be useful in screening for seafarers prone to boredom and depression for their fitness for embarkation. 

Abstract

Background: The question we asked was whether it is worthwhile screening for seafarers who are prone to boredom, and whose mental health might deteriorate on board because of the particular character of life at sea.

Materials and methods: We used the Farmer and Sundberg Boredom Proneness Scale (BPS), validated in French, as well as the Zigmond and Snaith Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). The survey was voluntary and responses were collected by means of questionnaires which were returned by post. 

Results: Eighty seafarers (40 officers and 40 crew) as well as 63 office staff from the same shipping company were included in the survey. We found a significant difference between officers and operational personnel: average score of 8.4 ± 5 (median = 7) for officers and 10.2 ± 4.8 (median = 10) for operational personnel. 21% of the officers have scores greater than or equal to 12 compared with 41% of the crew. There is a significant correlation between the BPS and HADS test scores, in terms of depression, for the office staff and the seafarers taken as a whole; this correlation being highly significant among officers (r = +0.85), but only marginally significant among crew members (r = +0.54). 

Conclusions: The BPS may be useful in screening for seafarers prone to boredom and depression for their fitness for embarkation. 

Get Citation

Keywords

boredom; anxiety; hopelessness; seafarers; fitness; stress

About this article
Title

Don’t forget about seafarer’s boredom

Journal

International Maritime Health

Issue

Vol 70, No 2 (2019)

Pages

82-87

Published online

2019-06-25

DOI

10.5603/IMH.2019.0013

Pubmed

31237666

Bibliographic record

International Maritime Health 2019;70(2):82-87.

Keywords

boredom
anxiety
hopelessness
seafarers
fitness
stress

Authors

Dominique Jegaden
Myriam Menaheze
David Lucas
Brice Loddé
Jean-Dominique Dewitte

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