open access

Vol 69, No 4 (2018)
Case report
Published online: 2018-12-19
Submitted: 2018-12-03
Accepted: 2018-12-11
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Occupational disease due to Anisakis simplex in fish handlers

Mikel Uña-Gorospe, Inmaculada Herrera-Mozo, Maria Luisa Canals, Gabriel Martí-Amengual, Pere Sanz-Gallen
DOI: 10.5603/IMH.2018.0042
·
Pubmed: 30589066
·
International Maritime Health 2018;69(4):264-269.

open access

Vol 69, No 4 (2018)
MARITIME/OCCUPATIONAL MEDICINE Case report
Published online: 2018-12-19
Submitted: 2018-12-03
Accepted: 2018-12-11

Abstract

Background: Anisakis is a marine nematode. Its larvae can be found encysted in several species, both in
the abdominal cavity and in the adjacent musculature. The most commonly affected commercial species
are hake, whiting, cod, and mackerel. The prevalence in fish varies according to the fishing area and the
size of the host.
Materials and methods: Until now only three species have been confirmed to be involved in human anisakiasis,
the most common ones being A. simplex sensu stricto (s.s.) and A. pegreffii, and anecdotally,
A. physeteris. Infestation in humans occurs when they eat raw or undercooked parasitized fish or cephalopods
(pickled, cold-smoked, salted, semi-preserved, prepared in certain Asian styles like sushi or sashimi, ceviche).
Results: The majority of anisakiasis cases have been described by Japanese authors. However, over the
last few years there has been an increase in the number of cases reported in other countries including Italy
and Spain. It is estimated that its incidence in the European Union is 0.32/100,000, and in the Basque
Country (Spain), this parasite is responsible for 10% of anaphylaxis cases and 32% of urticaria cases in
adults aged 40–60 years, around 300 cases/year. Anisakis-related disease in the work environment (occupational
disease) is less common.
Conclusions: We present three cases of the occupational disease in Spain due to a type I hypersensitivity to
Anisakis simplex in individuals who handle fish (one fishmonger, one supermarket employee, and one chef).

Abstract

Background: Anisakis is a marine nematode. Its larvae can be found encysted in several species, both in
the abdominal cavity and in the adjacent musculature. The most commonly affected commercial species
are hake, whiting, cod, and mackerel. The prevalence in fish varies according to the fishing area and the
size of the host.
Materials and methods: Until now only three species have been confirmed to be involved in human anisakiasis,
the most common ones being A. simplex sensu stricto (s.s.) and A. pegreffii, and anecdotally,
A. physeteris. Infestation in humans occurs when they eat raw or undercooked parasitized fish or cephalopods
(pickled, cold-smoked, salted, semi-preserved, prepared in certain Asian styles like sushi or sashimi, ceviche).
Results: The majority of anisakiasis cases have been described by Japanese authors. However, over the
last few years there has been an increase in the number of cases reported in other countries including Italy
and Spain. It is estimated that its incidence in the European Union is 0.32/100,000, and in the Basque
Country (Spain), this parasite is responsible for 10% of anaphylaxis cases and 32% of urticaria cases in
adults aged 40–60 years, around 300 cases/year. Anisakis-related disease in the work environment (occupational
disease) is less common.
Conclusions: We present three cases of the occupational disease in Spain due to a type I hypersensitivity to
Anisakis simplex in individuals who handle fish (one fishmonger, one supermarket employee, and one chef).

Get Citation

Keywords

Anisakis; occupational disease; type I hypersensitivity; acute urticaria; protein contact dermatitis

About this article
Title

Occupational disease due to Anisakis simplex in fish handlers

Journal

International Maritime Health

Issue

Vol 69, No 4 (2018)

Article type

Case report

Pages

264-269

Published online

2018-12-19

DOI

10.5603/IMH.2018.0042

Pubmed

30589066

Bibliographic record

International Maritime Health 2018;69(4):264-269.

Keywords

Anisakis
occupational disease
type I hypersensitivity
acute urticaria
protein contact dermatitis

Authors

Mikel Uña-Gorospe
Inmaculada Herrera-Mozo
Maria Luisa Canals
Gabriel Martí-Amengual
Pere Sanz-Gallen

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