open access

Vol 68, No 3 (2017)
MARITIME MEDICINE Original articles
Published online: 2017-09-27
Submitted: 2017-06-09
Accepted: 2017-07-31
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The effect of hardiness on symptoms of insomnia during a naval mission

Morten Nordmo, Sigurd William Hystad, Sverre Sanden, Bjørn Helge Johnsen
DOI: 10.5603/IMH.2017.0026
·
Pubmed: 28952659
·
International Maritime Health 2017;68(3):147-152.

open access

Vol 68, No 3 (2017)
MARITIME MEDICINE Original articles
Published online: 2017-09-27
Submitted: 2017-06-09
Accepted: 2017-07-31

Abstract

Background: Sleep is increasingly being recognised as important for the health and well-being of sailors. The aim of the current study is to investigate the relationship between hardiness and reported insomnia-symptoms in a maritime military setting during a 4-month counter piracy naval mission in the Gulf of Aden.

Materials and methods: A sample of 281 officers, sailors, and enlisted personnel were measured on levels of hardiness before the mission. The participants were split into low and high hardiness groups based on the group level mean. Insomnia-symptoms were measured before, midway and at the end of the mission.

Results: The results showed a significant main effect of time and a significant main effect of hardiness. The crew experienced the most insomnia symptoms in the middle of the mission and the high hardy group experienced less insomnia symptoms, in total, during the mission. There was also found a significant interaction effect of time and hardiness. The high hardiness group experienced less insomnia symptoms before and towards the end of the mission.

Conclusions: The results indicate that high levels of hardiness may be a protective factor between the stressors of a naval mission and symptoms of insomnia.  

Abstract

Background: Sleep is increasingly being recognised as important for the health and well-being of sailors. The aim of the current study is to investigate the relationship between hardiness and reported insomnia-symptoms in a maritime military setting during a 4-month counter piracy naval mission in the Gulf of Aden.

Materials and methods: A sample of 281 officers, sailors, and enlisted personnel were measured on levels of hardiness before the mission. The participants were split into low and high hardiness groups based on the group level mean. Insomnia-symptoms were measured before, midway and at the end of the mission.

Results: The results showed a significant main effect of time and a significant main effect of hardiness. The crew experienced the most insomnia symptoms in the middle of the mission and the high hardy group experienced less insomnia symptoms, in total, during the mission. There was also found a significant interaction effect of time and hardiness. The high hardiness group experienced less insomnia symptoms before and towards the end of the mission.

Conclusions: The results indicate that high levels of hardiness may be a protective factor between the stressors of a naval mission and symptoms of insomnia.  

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Keywords

hardiness, resilience, insomnia, sleep, health, navy, vessel

About this article
Title

The effect of hardiness on symptoms of insomnia during a naval mission

Journal

International Maritime Health

Issue

Vol 68, No 3 (2017)

Pages

147-152

Published online

2017-09-27

DOI

10.5603/IMH.2017.0026

Pubmed

28952659

Bibliographic record

International Maritime Health 2017;68(3):147-152.

Keywords

hardiness
resilience
insomnia
sleep
health
navy
vessel

Authors

Morten Nordmo
Sigurd William Hystad
Sverre Sanden
Bjørn Helge Johnsen

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