open access

Vol 68, No 1 (2017)
MARITIME MEDICINE Original articles
Published online: 2017-03-30
Submitted: 2016-11-21
Accepted: 2017-01-24
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Factors affecting health-promoting lifestyle profile in Iranian male seafarers working on tankers

Fereshteh Baygi, Olaf Chresten Jensen, Fatemeh Mohammadi-Nasrabadi, Mostafa Qorbani, Morteza Mansourian, Roksana Mirkazemi, Aliasghar Farshad, Seyed Ali Salehi, Arezoo Haghighian Roudsari, Farzad Shidfar
DOI: 10.5603/IMH.2017.0001
·
Pubmed: 28357829
·
International Maritime Health 2017;68(1):1-6.

open access

Vol 68, No 1 (2017)
MARITIME MEDICINE Original articles
Published online: 2017-03-30
Submitted: 2016-11-21
Accepted: 2017-01-24

Abstract

Background: Seafaring is a risky occupation that is associated with a high incidence of lifestyle-related diseases. The present study was carried out to examine health promotion behaviour and its associated factors in seafarers of the National Iranian Tanker Company.

Materials and methods: A cross-sectional study was performed on 200 Iranian male seafarers in 2015. A self-administered socio-demographic and Health Promotion Lifestyle Profile II (HPLP-II) questionnaire was completed. One-way analysis of variance was used to identify significant differences among the various departments. The t-test was utilised to compare the HPLP-II scores according to the demographic variables. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to assess the association between demographic variables and the overall HPLP-II score, in addition to the six health-promoting lifestyle subscale scores.

Results: The mean age of the participants was 35.93 ± 9.51 years. Most of the seafarers were categorised as having a moderate (32%) or good lifestyle (61.5%). The mean lifestyle score was 136.14 ± 19.90, with the subscale spiritual growth showing the highest score (26.16 ± 5.03) and the subscale exercise behaviour showing the lowest score (19.95 ± 4.23). The lowest score for nutrition was found among the seafarers working in the engine department (engine: 20.41 ± 4.50, deck: 23.52 ± 4.97, and galley: 24.83 ± 4.64) (p < 0.05). Working in the engine department was found to have a significant negative effect on the nutrition score (B = –3.57, p < 0.05). Moreover, educational level was found to have a significant positive effect on spiritual growth (B = 2.97, p < 0.05).

Conclusions: The findings suggest that health-related issues in this occupation, especially workers in the engine room, are a matter of concern.

Abstract

Background: Seafaring is a risky occupation that is associated with a high incidence of lifestyle-related diseases. The present study was carried out to examine health promotion behaviour and its associated factors in seafarers of the National Iranian Tanker Company.

Materials and methods: A cross-sectional study was performed on 200 Iranian male seafarers in 2015. A self-administered socio-demographic and Health Promotion Lifestyle Profile II (HPLP-II) questionnaire was completed. One-way analysis of variance was used to identify significant differences among the various departments. The t-test was utilised to compare the HPLP-II scores according to the demographic variables. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to assess the association between demographic variables and the overall HPLP-II score, in addition to the six health-promoting lifestyle subscale scores.

Results: The mean age of the participants was 35.93 ± 9.51 years. Most of the seafarers were categorised as having a moderate (32%) or good lifestyle (61.5%). The mean lifestyle score was 136.14 ± 19.90, with the subscale spiritual growth showing the highest score (26.16 ± 5.03) and the subscale exercise behaviour showing the lowest score (19.95 ± 4.23). The lowest score for nutrition was found among the seafarers working in the engine department (engine: 20.41 ± 4.50, deck: 23.52 ± 4.97, and galley: 24.83 ± 4.64) (p < 0.05). Working in the engine department was found to have a significant negative effect on the nutrition score (B = –3.57, p < 0.05). Moreover, educational level was found to have a significant positive effect on spiritual growth (B = 2.97, p < 0.05).

Conclusions: The findings suggest that health-related issues in this occupation, especially workers in the engine room, are a matter of concern.

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Keywords

health promotion, lifestyle, seafarer, health behaviour

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About this article
Title

Factors affecting health-promoting lifestyle profile in Iranian male seafarers working on tankers

Journal

International Maritime Health

Issue

Vol 68, No 1 (2017)

Pages

1-6

Published online

2017-03-30

DOI

10.5603/IMH.2017.0001

Pubmed

28357829

Bibliographic record

International Maritime Health 2017;68(1):1-6.

Keywords

health promotion
lifestyle
seafarer
health behaviour

Authors

Fereshteh Baygi
Olaf Chresten Jensen
Fatemeh Mohammadi-Nasrabadi
Mostafa Qorbani
Morteza Mansourian
Roksana Mirkazemi
Aliasghar Farshad
Seyed Ali Salehi
Arezoo Haghighian Roudsari
Farzad Shidfar

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