open access

Vol 66, No 3 (2015)
TROPICAL MEDICINE Review articles
Published online: 2015-09-22
Submitted: 2015-09-22
Accepted: 2015-09-22
Get Citation

Skin lesions in returning travellers

Krzysztof Korzeniewski, Dariusz Juszczak, Janusz Jerzemowski
DOI: 10.5603/IMH.2015.0034
·
Pubmed: 26394319
·
International Maritime Health 2015;66(3):173-180.

open access

Vol 66, No 3 (2015)
TROPICAL MEDICINE Review articles
Published online: 2015-09-22
Submitted: 2015-09-22
Accepted: 2015-09-22

Abstract

Skin lesions, apart from diarrhoeas, fever of unknown origin, and respiratory tract infections belong to the most frequent medical problems in travellers returned from tropical and subtropical destinations, accounting more than 10% of reported cases. Most dermatoses have their clinical onset during travel, although some of them can occur after return. Travel-related dermatological problems can have a wide spectrum of clinical picture, from macular, popular or nodular rash, linear and migratory lesions, to plaques, vesicles, bullae, erosions or ulcers. Skin conditions in returning travellers may be of infectious and non-infectious aetiologies. Infectious lesions may be originally tropical (e.g. dengue, chikungunya, schistosomiasis, leishmaniasis, myiasis, tungiasis, loiasis), although the majority are cosmopolitan (arthropod bites, sunburns, allergic rashes). The evaluation of skin lesions depends on many factors, including immune status of patients, use of medicines, exposure on health hazards (fauna, flora, risky behaviours), as well as the time, duration and location of travel. As the number of travellers to tropical and subtropical destinations has been continuously rising, the number of skin illnesses has also been increasing. This means that specialists in travel medicine need to extend their knowledge of epidemiology, clinical features and diagnosis of travel-related health problems including skin lesions in returning travellers.

Abstract

Skin lesions, apart from diarrhoeas, fever of unknown origin, and respiratory tract infections belong to the most frequent medical problems in travellers returned from tropical and subtropical destinations, accounting more than 10% of reported cases. Most dermatoses have their clinical onset during travel, although some of them can occur after return. Travel-related dermatological problems can have a wide spectrum of clinical picture, from macular, popular or nodular rash, linear and migratory lesions, to plaques, vesicles, bullae, erosions or ulcers. Skin conditions in returning travellers may be of infectious and non-infectious aetiologies. Infectious lesions may be originally tropical (e.g. dengue, chikungunya, schistosomiasis, leishmaniasis, myiasis, tungiasis, loiasis), although the majority are cosmopolitan (arthropod bites, sunburns, allergic rashes). The evaluation of skin lesions depends on many factors, including immune status of patients, use of medicines, exposure on health hazards (fauna, flora, risky behaviours), as well as the time, duration and location of travel. As the number of travellers to tropical and subtropical destinations has been continuously rising, the number of skin illnesses has also been increasing. This means that specialists in travel medicine need to extend their knowledge of epidemiology, clinical features and diagnosis of travel-related health problems including skin lesions in returning travellers.

Get Citation

Keywords

skin lesions, returning travellers, tropics

About this article
Title

Skin lesions in returning travellers

Journal

International Maritime Health

Issue

Vol 66, No 3 (2015)

Pages

173-180

Published online

2015-09-22

DOI

10.5603/IMH.2015.0034

Pubmed

26394319

Bibliographic record

International Maritime Health 2015;66(3):173-180.

Keywords

skin lesions
returning travellers
tropics

Authors

Krzysztof Korzeniewski
Dariusz Juszczak
Janusz Jerzemowski

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