open access

Vol 64, No 4 (2013)
MARITIME PSYCHOLOGY Original article
Published online: 2013-12-17
Submitted: 2013-12-17
Accepted: 2013-12-17
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The Psychological General Well-Being Index (PGWBI) for assessing stress of seafarers on board merchant ships

Anna Carotenuto, Angiola M. Fasanaro, Ivana Molino, Fabio Sibilio, Andrea Saturnino, Enea Traini, Francesco Amenta
DOI: 10.5603/IMH.2013.0007
·
International Maritime Health 2013;64(4):215-220.

open access

Vol 64, No 4 (2013)
MARITIME PSYCHOLOGY Original article
Published online: 2013-12-17
Submitted: 2013-12-17
Accepted: 2013-12-17

Abstract

Background: In their working activity, seafarers are exposed to high levels of stress that should be accuratelyinvestigated, measured, followed up and, if possible, countered. This is also required by regulations recently entered into force such as the Maritime Labour Convention 2006, recommending to consider special physiological or psychological problems created by the shipboard environment. The choice of the tools for this evaluation is challenging, and a common basic standard usable in a large scale should be identified.

Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate: 1) the suitability of the Psychological General Well-Being Index (PGWBI) questionnaire conducted on board for assessing stress in the sailing seafarers, 2) The presenceof stress in seafarers of different categories (deck officers, engine officers, deck crew, engine crew, chiefstewards/catering staff) monitored by the PGWBI.

Materials and methods: 162 male seafarers on board of 7 tankers belonging to the same shipping companywere evaluated through the PGWB questionnaire. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to analyse thedifferences in the scores of the questionnaire.

Results: Engine officers exhibited significantly higher anxiety levels than the deck or engine crew, andshowed lower satisfaction than the deck crew. Deck and engine officers revealed higher self-control levelsthan the engine crew. Chief stewards/catering staff showed lower vitality levels than the deck crew.

Conclusions: Deck or engine officers should achieve a greater self-control than the crew and this is documentedby the present study. Our findings support the view that management responsibility is more often associated with higher levels of stress. In our opinion, the PGWB questionnaire is a reasonable compromise forobtaining a global evaluation of psychological conditions, including stress of seafarers. It should be therefore considered as a large scale tool for assessing the well-being and eventual stress levels of sailing seafarers.

Abstract

Background: In their working activity, seafarers are exposed to high levels of stress that should be accuratelyinvestigated, measured, followed up and, if possible, countered. This is also required by regulations recently entered into force such as the Maritime Labour Convention 2006, recommending to consider special physiological or psychological problems created by the shipboard environment. The choice of the tools for this evaluation is challenging, and a common basic standard usable in a large scale should be identified.

Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate: 1) the suitability of the Psychological General Well-Being Index (PGWBI) questionnaire conducted on board for assessing stress in the sailing seafarers, 2) The presenceof stress in seafarers of different categories (deck officers, engine officers, deck crew, engine crew, chiefstewards/catering staff) monitored by the PGWBI.

Materials and methods: 162 male seafarers on board of 7 tankers belonging to the same shipping companywere evaluated through the PGWB questionnaire. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to analyse thedifferences in the scores of the questionnaire.

Results: Engine officers exhibited significantly higher anxiety levels than the deck or engine crew, andshowed lower satisfaction than the deck crew. Deck and engine officers revealed higher self-control levelsthan the engine crew. Chief stewards/catering staff showed lower vitality levels than the deck crew.

Conclusions: Deck or engine officers should achieve a greater self-control than the crew and this is documentedby the present study. Our findings support the view that management responsibility is more often associated with higher levels of stress. In our opinion, the PGWB questionnaire is a reasonable compromise forobtaining a global evaluation of psychological conditions, including stress of seafarers. It should be therefore considered as a large scale tool for assessing the well-being and eventual stress levels of sailing seafarers.

Get Citation

Keywords

seafarers, stress, on board evaluation, Psychological General Well-Being Index

About this article
Title

The Psychological General Well-Being Index (PGWBI) for assessing stress of seafarers on board merchant ships

Journal

International Maritime Health

Issue

Vol 64, No 4 (2013)

Pages

215-220

Published online

2013-12-17

DOI

10.5603/IMH.2013.0007

Bibliographic record

International Maritime Health 2013;64(4):215-220.

Keywords

seafarers
stress
on board evaluation
Psychological General Well-Being Index

Authors

Anna Carotenuto
Angiola M. Fasanaro
Ivana Molino
Fabio Sibilio
Andrea Saturnino
Enea Traini
Francesco Amenta

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