open access

Vol 72, No 3 (2021)
Review article
Published online: 2021-09-29
Submitted: 2021-01-11
Accepted: 2021-08-07
Get Citation

Occupational noise exposure and health impacts among fish harvesters: a systematic review

Om Prakash Yadav1, Atanu Sarkar1, Desai Shan1, Arifur Rahman1, Lorenzo Moro23
DOI: 10.5603/IMH.2021.0038
·
Pubmed: 34604990
·
International Maritime Health 2021;72(3):199-205.
Affiliations
  1. Division of Community Health and Humanities, Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University, St. John’s NL A1B 3V6, Canada
  2. Department of Ocean and Naval Architectural Engineering, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s NL A1B 3X5, Canada
  3. SafetyNet Centre for Occupational Health and Safety Research, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s NL A1B 5S7, Canada

open access

Vol 72, No 3 (2021)
OCCUPATIONAL MEDICINE Review article
Published online: 2021-09-29
Submitted: 2021-01-11
Accepted: 2021-08-07

Abstract

Background: Occupational noise exposure has been identified as a significant risk factor for fish harvesters. Chronic noise exposure causes hearing and other health problems and undermines the quality of life and well-being. This review paper aims to highlight noise-related auditory and non-auditory health effects among fish harvesters.
Materials and methods: A systematic literature search approach was adopted using the following databases: PubMed, Embase, SCOPUS, Web of Science, Google Scholar, and by exploring grey literature. The literature search was conducted in 2020 (between October 15 and November 30). Relevant articles were explored by reviewing title, keywords, and abstract based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria. The full-text critical review of selected papers was made and finalized the most relevant studies.
Results: Initial 1,281 records were identified, exploring various databases and additional sources using relevant keywords. Duplicate articles were removed and retrieved 746 articles. After that, a screening of 746 research papers was done based on the selection criteria and finalised 28 articles for full-text review. Finally, articles were filtered based on the study’s aim and extracted 17 papers for the final review.
Conclusions: Noise-induced hearing loss was considered a significant health risk to fish harvesters across the studies, affecting physical and emotional well-being. The prevalence of hearing loss was observed from 6% to 80%. Other health problems, such as headache, dizziness, annoyance, stress, fatigue, elevated blood pressure, sleep disturbances, and impaired cognitive performance, were also reported. Further research is needed to validate the non-auditory health effects among fish harvesters.

Abstract

Background: Occupational noise exposure has been identified as a significant risk factor for fish harvesters. Chronic noise exposure causes hearing and other health problems and undermines the quality of life and well-being. This review paper aims to highlight noise-related auditory and non-auditory health effects among fish harvesters.
Materials and methods: A systematic literature search approach was adopted using the following databases: PubMed, Embase, SCOPUS, Web of Science, Google Scholar, and by exploring grey literature. The literature search was conducted in 2020 (between October 15 and November 30). Relevant articles were explored by reviewing title, keywords, and abstract based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria. The full-text critical review of selected papers was made and finalized the most relevant studies.
Results: Initial 1,281 records were identified, exploring various databases and additional sources using relevant keywords. Duplicate articles were removed and retrieved 746 articles. After that, a screening of 746 research papers was done based on the selection criteria and finalised 28 articles for full-text review. Finally, articles were filtered based on the study’s aim and extracted 17 papers for the final review.
Conclusions: Noise-induced hearing loss was considered a significant health risk to fish harvesters across the studies, affecting physical and emotional well-being. The prevalence of hearing loss was observed from 6% to 80%. Other health problems, such as headache, dizziness, annoyance, stress, fatigue, elevated blood pressure, sleep disturbances, and impaired cognitive performance, were also reported. Further research is needed to validate the non-auditory health effects among fish harvesters.

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Keywords

occupational noise exposure, hearing loss, noise-induced hearing loss, tinnitus, sound pressure level, fish harvesters

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About this article
Title

Occupational noise exposure and health impacts among fish harvesters: a systematic review

Journal

International Maritime Health

Issue

Vol 72, No 3 (2021)

Article type

Review article

Pages

199-205

Published online

2021-09-29

DOI

10.5603/IMH.2021.0038

Pubmed

34604990

Bibliographic record

International Maritime Health 2021;72(3):199-205.

Keywords

occupational noise exposure
hearing loss
noise-induced hearing loss
tinnitus
sound pressure level
fish harvesters

Authors

Om Prakash Yadav
Atanu Sarkar
Desai Shan
Arifur Rahman
Lorenzo Moro

References (36)
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