open access

Vol 68, No 4 (2017)
Original article
Published online: 2017-12-22
Submitted: 2017-08-01
Accepted: 2017-09-26
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Does psychological capital moderate the relationship between worries about accidents and sleepiness?

Kjersti Bergheim Valdersnes, Jarle Eid, Sigurd William Hystad, Morten Birkeland Nielsen
DOI: 10.5603/IMH.2017.0043
·
Pubmed: 29297576
·
International Maritime Health 2017;68(4):245-251.

open access

Vol 68, No 4 (2017)
MARITIME PSYCHOLOGY Original article
Published online: 2017-12-22
Submitted: 2017-08-01
Accepted: 2017-09-26

Abstract

The present study investigated psychological capital (PsyCap) as a protective factor in the relationship between worries about accidents and sleepiness among seafarers. The hypothesis that strong PsyCap weakens the relationship between worries about accidents and sleepiness was tested in a cross-sectional sample of 397 maritime workers. In contrast to expectations, the findings indicated a reverse buffering effect in that PsyCap only had a protective impact on sleepiness when worries about accidents were low. For workers that were highly worried, a strong PsyCap was associated with increased levels of sleepiness. The established associations remained consistent after controlling for workers’ years of experience as seafarers, and their ratings of psychological safety climate. An interpretation of this finding is that seafarers with high levels of PsyCap will be attentive when the threat level is serious, but will not be bothered when exposed to everyday strain and hassles associated with their work situation.

Abstract

The present study investigated psychological capital (PsyCap) as a protective factor in the relationship between worries about accidents and sleepiness among seafarers. The hypothesis that strong PsyCap weakens the relationship between worries about accidents and sleepiness was tested in a cross-sectional sample of 397 maritime workers. In contrast to expectations, the findings indicated a reverse buffering effect in that PsyCap only had a protective impact on sleepiness when worries about accidents were low. For workers that were highly worried, a strong PsyCap was associated with increased levels of sleepiness. The established associations remained consistent after controlling for workers’ years of experience as seafarers, and their ratings of psychological safety climate. An interpretation of this finding is that seafarers with high levels of PsyCap will be attentive when the threat level is serious, but will not be bothered when exposed to everyday strain and hassles associated with their work situation.
Get Citation

Keywords

psychological capital, psychological safety climate, risk perception, sleep quality, maritime

About this article
Title

Does psychological capital moderate the relationship between worries about accidents and sleepiness?

Journal

International Maritime Health

Issue

Vol 68, No 4 (2017)

Article type

Original article

Pages

245-251

Published online

2017-12-22

DOI

10.5603/IMH.2017.0043

Pubmed

29297576

Bibliographic record

International Maritime Health 2017;68(4):245-251.

Keywords

psychological capital
psychological safety climate
risk perception
sleep quality
maritime

Authors

Kjersti Bergheim Valdersnes
Jarle Eid
Sigurd William Hystad
Morten Birkeland Nielsen

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