open access

Vol 64, No 2 (2013)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2013-05-23
Submitted: 2013-05-23
Accepted: 2013-05-23
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Relationship between Neuroticism, threat of shock and heart rate variability reactivity

Anita L. Hansen, Bjørn Helge Johnsen
International Maritime Health 2013;64(2):54-60.

open access

Vol 64, No 2 (2013)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2013-05-23
Submitted: 2013-05-23
Accepted: 2013-05-23

Abstract

The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between Neuroticism, non-executive functioningand heart rate variability (HRV) in both threat and non-threat situations. Sixty-five male sailors fromthe Royal Norwegian Navy participated in the study. Participants were randomly assigned into non-threat andthreat groups. Neuroticism was measured by the NEO-PI-R and, based on the median-split of Neuroticism,groups were divided into 2 additional groups. A Visual Search Task was used to measure non-executivefunctioning. HRV reactivity was measured during baseline-, test- and recovery-conditions. Overall, the resultsrevealed that there were no differences between any of the groups in terms of the performance onthe Visual Search Task: this was true for both accuracy data and mean reaction time. However, the resultsshowed that the High Neuroticism Threat Group had a significant increase in HRV from test-condition torecovery. This may indicate that the High Neuroticism Threat Group found the whole task condition morestressful due to the threat situation.

Abstract

The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between Neuroticism, non-executive functioningand heart rate variability (HRV) in both threat and non-threat situations. Sixty-five male sailors fromthe Royal Norwegian Navy participated in the study. Participants were randomly assigned into non-threat andthreat groups. Neuroticism was measured by the NEO-PI-R and, based on the median-split of Neuroticism,groups were divided into 2 additional groups. A Visual Search Task was used to measure non-executivefunctioning. HRV reactivity was measured during baseline-, test- and recovery-conditions. Overall, the resultsrevealed that there were no differences between any of the groups in terms of the performance onthe Visual Search Task: this was true for both accuracy data and mean reaction time. However, the resultsshowed that the High Neuroticism Threat Group had a significant increase in HRV from test-condition torecovery. This may indicate that the High Neuroticism Threat Group found the whole task condition morestressful due to the threat situation.
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Keywords

Neuroticism, threat of shock, heart rate variability, non-executive function

About this article
Title

Relationship between Neuroticism, threat of shock and heart rate variability reactivity

Journal

International Maritime Health

Issue

Vol 64, No 2 (2013)

Pages

54-60

Published online

2013-05-23

Bibliographic record

International Maritime Health 2013;64(2):54-60.

Keywords

Neuroticism
threat of shock
heart rate variability
non-executive function

Authors

Anita L. Hansen
Bjørn Helge Johnsen

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