open access

Vol 60, No 1-2 (2009)
MARITIME MEDICINE Review articles
Submitted: 2013-02-18
Published online: 2009-12-17
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Promotion of healthy nutrition of seafarers

Maria Jeżewska, Ewa Babicz-Zielińska, Irena Leszczyńska, Marta Grubman
International Maritime Health 2009;60(1-2):48-50.

open access

Vol 60, No 1-2 (2009)
MARITIME MEDICINE Review articles
Submitted: 2013-02-18
Published online: 2009-12-17

Abstract

Nutrition disorders arise from various interacting factors: cultural, environmental, genetic, physiological, and psychological. Excessive consumption of highly processed food, sugar, salt, alcohol, and saturated fats is a problem nowadays, and consumption of fish, vegetables, and fruit is insufficient. Overeating and an unbalanced diet are often accompanied by stress and a lack of physical activity. This is intensified by easy access to “comfort food”, “fast food”, and “junk food”. The number of people suffering from overweight and obesity, so-called diseases of civilization, is increasing. Not only is being overweight a risk factor for the development many other metabolic diseases, but it also significantly worsens the quality of life. This also concerns people working at sea. Obesity is favoured by emotional eating disorders (EED), uncontrolled/compulsive eating - binge eating disorders (BED), and night eating disorders (NED). Most frequently, eating is a reaction to stress or boredom. It alleviates tension and improves the mood, also of seafarers.

Abstract

Nutrition disorders arise from various interacting factors: cultural, environmental, genetic, physiological, and psychological. Excessive consumption of highly processed food, sugar, salt, alcohol, and saturated fats is a problem nowadays, and consumption of fish, vegetables, and fruit is insufficient. Overeating and an unbalanced diet are often accompanied by stress and a lack of physical activity. This is intensified by easy access to “comfort food”, “fast food”, and “junk food”. The number of people suffering from overweight and obesity, so-called diseases of civilization, is increasing. Not only is being overweight a risk factor for the development many other metabolic diseases, but it also significantly worsens the quality of life. This also concerns people working at sea. Obesity is favoured by emotional eating disorders (EED), uncontrolled/compulsive eating - binge eating disorders (BED), and night eating disorders (NED). Most frequently, eating is a reaction to stress or boredom. It alleviates tension and improves the mood, also of seafarers.
Get Citation

Keywords

eating disorders; nutrition standards; overweight/obesity; promotion of healthy nutrition

About this article
Title

Promotion of healthy nutrition of seafarers

Journal

International Maritime Health

Issue

Vol 60, No 1-2 (2009)

Pages

48-50

Published online

2009-12-17

Bibliographic record

International Maritime Health 2009;60(1-2):48-50.

Keywords

eating disorders
nutrition standards
overweight/obesity
promotion of healthy nutrition

Authors

Maria Jeżewska
Ewa Babicz-Zielińska
Irena Leszczyńska
Marta Grubman

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