open access

Vol 61, No 1 (2010)
MARITIME MEDICINE Original articles
Published online: 2010-05-21
Submitted: 2013-02-18
Get Citation

A first response bag with standardized contents for medical emergencies on cruise ships

Eilif Dahl, Art Diskin, Angela C. Giusti, Anne Bilé, Steve Williams
International Maritime Health 2010;61(1):18-23.

open access

Vol 61, No 1 (2010)
MARITIME MEDICINE Original articles
Published online: 2010-05-21
Submitted: 2013-02-18

Abstract

Background. There are no international rules regarding which medical supplies to bring when the nurseon- duty is called to emergencies outside a cruise ship's infirmary. Ideally, one First Response Bag should contain all that is needed to manage the initial 10–15 minutes of any medical emergency until the patient can be safely transported to the ship's infirmary. Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd recently decided to establish a fleet-wide standardized First Response Bag for initial management of cardiac and other emergencies encountered by the nurse-on-duty outside the ship's infirmary.
Material and methods. A prototype First Response Bag was tried out on one ship. A PowerPoint presentation of the bag with its contents was then circulated by e-mail to all 33 infirmaries of the fleet, and comments from all 181 medical staff members were invited. All responses were discussed fleet-wide for consensus.
Results. Responses from 18 ships triggered eager discussions. The resulting First Response Bag was considered by all an improvement compared to the solutions practiced previously on most ships of the fleet. The bag is a lightweight combined roller and backpack with 12 compartments, and it has well-organized, easily accessible, fleet-wide standardized minimal supplies. It contains what is needed to manage the initial phase of a cardiac arrest and other emergencies.
Conclusions. This initiative may inspire other companies in standardization efforts and trigger cruise industry-wide cooperation'with the ultimate goal of an internationally accepted first response bag standard.
Int Marit Health 2010; 61, 1: 18-23

Abstract

Background. There are no international rules regarding which medical supplies to bring when the nurseon- duty is called to emergencies outside a cruise ship's infirmary. Ideally, one First Response Bag should contain all that is needed to manage the initial 10–15 minutes of any medical emergency until the patient can be safely transported to the ship's infirmary. Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd recently decided to establish a fleet-wide standardized First Response Bag for initial management of cardiac and other emergencies encountered by the nurse-on-duty outside the ship's infirmary.
Material and methods. A prototype First Response Bag was tried out on one ship. A PowerPoint presentation of the bag with its contents was then circulated by e-mail to all 33 infirmaries of the fleet, and comments from all 181 medical staff members were invited. All responses were discussed fleet-wide for consensus.
Results. Responses from 18 ships triggered eager discussions. The resulting First Response Bag was considered by all an improvement compared to the solutions practiced previously on most ships of the fleet. The bag is a lightweight combined roller and backpack with 12 compartments, and it has well-organized, easily accessible, fleet-wide standardized minimal supplies. It contains what is needed to manage the initial phase of a cardiac arrest and other emergencies.
Conclusions. This initiative may inspire other companies in standardization efforts and trigger cruise industry-wide cooperation'with the ultimate goal of an internationally accepted first response bag standard.
Int Marit Health 2010; 61, 1: 18-23
Get Citation

Keywords

emergency medical equipment; cardiac arrest; cruise ship

About this article
Title

A first response bag with standardized contents for medical emergencies on cruise ships

Journal

International Maritime Health

Issue

Vol 61, No 1 (2010)

Pages

18-23

Published online

2010-05-21

Bibliographic record

International Maritime Health 2010;61(1):18-23.

Keywords

emergency medical equipment
cardiac arrest
cruise ship

Authors

Eilif Dahl
Art Diskin
Angela C. Giusti
Anne Bilé
Steve Williams

References (6)
  1. American College of Emergency Physicians. Health Care Guidelines for Cruise Ship Medical Facilities. October 2007. http:////www.acep.org/practres.aspx?id=29500 (18.01.2010).
  2. Novaro G, Bush H, Fromkin K, et al. Cardiovascular Emergencies in Cruise Ship Passengers. The American Journal of Cardiology. 2010; 105(2): 153–157.
  3. 2005 American Heart Association Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care. Circulation. 2005; 112(Suppl 1).
  4. Bobrow B, Spaite D. Do Not Pardon the Interruption. Annals of Emergency Medicine. 2009; 54(5): 653–655.
  5. Nolan J, Lockey D. Airway management for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest—More data required. Resuscitation. 2009; 80(12): 1333–1334.
  6. Bobrow B, Ewy G, Clark L, et al. Passive Oxygen Insufflation Is Superior to Bag-Valve-Mask Ventilation for Witnessed Ventricular Fibrillation Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest. Annals of Emergency Medicine. 2009; 54(5): 656–662.

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