open access

Vol 62, No 3 (2011)
MARITIME PSYCHOLOGY Original article
Published online: 2011-12-15
Submitted: 2013-02-18
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Psychosocial risk factors for work-related stress in Her Majesty’s Coastguard

S.E. Kingdom, A.P. Smith
International Maritime Health 2011;62(3):200-205.

open access

Vol 62, No 3 (2011)
MARITIME PSYCHOLOGY Original article
Published online: 2011-12-15
Submitted: 2013-02-18

Abstract

Background. To determine the extent to which work-related stress in Her Majesty’s Coastguard (HMCG) could be accounted for by the Effort-Reward Imbalance (ERI) and Job Demand-Control- -Support (JDCS) stress models.
Material and methods. Participants included a total of 282 coastguards. Data on risk factors were collected via questionnaire, within the wider context of the UK HSE Management Standards framework for stress reduction. Analyses included an examination of each model and its association with stress and mental health outcomes, as well as their impact in combination with the range of other risk factors measured.
Results. Significant predictors of stress included ERI, organisation change, and exposure to physical agents (noise). Anxiety was predicted by ERI, noise, and bullying, and depression by ERI, bullying, noise, training, and role conflict/ambiguity.
Conclusions. For this occupational group, the main source of high stress, anxiety, and depression was ERI. These results raise implications for the use and interpretation of data when using these models, as well as for HSE Management Standards, which are biased towards JDCS. Results from this and other studies also suggest further research is required into the benefits of a more flexible model or framework, which can examine both established and new combinations of risk factors.
(Int Marit Health 2011; 62, 3: 200–205)

Abstract

Background. To determine the extent to which work-related stress in Her Majesty’s Coastguard (HMCG) could be accounted for by the Effort-Reward Imbalance (ERI) and Job Demand-Control- -Support (JDCS) stress models.
Material and methods. Participants included a total of 282 coastguards. Data on risk factors were collected via questionnaire, within the wider context of the UK HSE Management Standards framework for stress reduction. Analyses included an examination of each model and its association with stress and mental health outcomes, as well as their impact in combination with the range of other risk factors measured.
Results. Significant predictors of stress included ERI, organisation change, and exposure to physical agents (noise). Anxiety was predicted by ERI, noise, and bullying, and depression by ERI, bullying, noise, training, and role conflict/ambiguity.
Conclusions. For this occupational group, the main source of high stress, anxiety, and depression was ERI. These results raise implications for the use and interpretation of data when using these models, as well as for HSE Management Standards, which are biased towards JDCS. Results from this and other studies also suggest further research is required into the benefits of a more flexible model or framework, which can examine both established and new combinations of risk factors.
(Int Marit Health 2011; 62, 3: 200–205)
Get Citation

Keywords

stress; coastguards; Job Demand-Control-Support (JDCS); Effort-Reward Imbalance (ERI); risk factors

About this article
Title

Psychosocial risk factors for work-related stress in Her Majesty’s Coastguard

Journal

International Maritime Health

Issue

Vol 62, No 3 (2011)

Pages

200-205

Published online

2011-12-15

Bibliographic record

International Maritime Health 2011;62(3):200-205.

Keywords

stress
coastguards
Job Demand-Control-Support (JDCS)
Effort-Reward Imbalance (ERI)
risk factors

Authors

S.E. Kingdom
A.P. Smith

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