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Review paper
Published online: 2021-05-26
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Robot-assisted donor hysterectomy in uterus transplantation — a modality to increase reproducibility

Roman Chmel jr., Zlatko Pastor, Marta Novackova, Roman Chmel
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2021.0052
·
Pubmed: 34105758

open access

Ahead of Print
REVIEW PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2021-05-26

Abstract

Uterus transplantation is a non-lifesaving vascularized composite allotransplantation procedure requiring immunosuppression until removal of the graft. The focus of uterus transplantation is changing regarding refining individual treatment procedures included in this complex treatment of absolute uterine factor infertility, such as robot-assisted donor hysterectomy. The inferior hypogastric nerve plexus should be preserved during robotic dissection of the ureter and uterine vessels to prevent postoperative complications such as urine and fecal evacuation disturbances and sexual disorders. As most uterus transplantations have been performed in living donor concepts, robot-assisted donor hysterectomy should contribute to increased availability of uterus transplantation, particularly because it uses the precise blood-less technique of surgical dissection in the deep pelvis and has cosmetic benefits among living donors.

Abstract

Uterus transplantation is a non-lifesaving vascularized composite allotransplantation procedure requiring immunosuppression until removal of the graft. The focus of uterus transplantation is changing regarding refining individual treatment procedures included in this complex treatment of absolute uterine factor infertility, such as robot-assisted donor hysterectomy. The inferior hypogastric nerve plexus should be preserved during robotic dissection of the ureter and uterine vessels to prevent postoperative complications such as urine and fecal evacuation disturbances and sexual disorders. As most uterus transplantations have been performed in living donor concepts, robot-assisted donor hysterectomy should contribute to increased availability of uterus transplantation, particularly because it uses the precise blood-less technique of surgical dissection in the deep pelvis and has cosmetic benefits among living donors.

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Keywords

robot-assisted surgery; hysterectomy; uterus; transplantation; living donor

About this article
Title

Robot-assisted donor hysterectomy in uterus transplantation — a modality to increase reproducibility

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Ahead of Print

Article type

Review paper

Published online

2021-05-26

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2021.0052

Pubmed

34105758

Keywords

robot-assisted surgery
hysterectomy
uterus
transplantation
living donor

Authors

Roman Chmel jr.
Zlatko Pastor
Marta Novackova
Roman Chmel

References (15)
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