open access

Vol 91, No 10 (2020)
Review paper
Published online: 2020-10-07
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Influenza vaccination in pregnancy — current data on safety and effectiveness

Aneta S. Nitsch-Osuch, Dorota Bomba-Opon, Mariusz Jasik
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2020.0105
·
Pubmed: 33184832
·
Ginekol Pol 2020;91(10):629-633.

open access

Vol 91, No 10 (2020)
REVIEW PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2020-10-07

Abstract

Pregnant women are at risk of severe and complicated influenza, and so are children aged 2-5 years. Despite numerous recommendations, influenza vaccination coverage in pregnant women is still low. The trigger for this article was the development of new quadrivalent influenza vaccines along with the publication of new studies on the safety and effectiveness of inactivated influenza vaccines in pregnant women, administered also in the first trimester of pregnancy. The inactivated quadrivalent influenza vaccine is a safe and effective measure for preventing influenza in both mother and child. Live attenuated influenza vaccines are contraindicated in pregnant women, whereas inactivated influenza vaccines should be recommended to all pregnant women, either healthy or with comorbidities. Influenza vaccines can be administered during any pregnancy trimester, at least two weeks before delivery. The time of vaccination depends on vaccine availability; however, it should not be postponed unless there are significant medical contraindications.

Abstract

Pregnant women are at risk of severe and complicated influenza, and so are children aged 2-5 years. Despite numerous recommendations, influenza vaccination coverage in pregnant women is still low. The trigger for this article was the development of new quadrivalent influenza vaccines along with the publication of new studies on the safety and effectiveness of inactivated influenza vaccines in pregnant women, administered also in the first trimester of pregnancy. The inactivated quadrivalent influenza vaccine is a safe and effective measure for preventing influenza in both mother and child. Live attenuated influenza vaccines are contraindicated in pregnant women, whereas inactivated influenza vaccines should be recommended to all pregnant women, either healthy or with comorbidities. Influenza vaccines can be administered during any pregnancy trimester, at least two weeks before delivery. The time of vaccination depends on vaccine availability; however, it should not be postponed unless there are significant medical contraindications.

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Keywords

effectiveness; influenza; pregnancy; safety; vaccine

About this article
Title

Influenza vaccination in pregnancy — current data on safety and effectiveness

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 91, No 10 (2020)

Article type

Review paper

Pages

629-633

Published online

2020-10-07

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2020.0105

Pubmed

33184832

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2020;91(10):629-633.

Keywords

effectiveness
influenza
pregnancy
safety
vaccine

Authors

Aneta S. Nitsch-Osuch
Dorota Bomba-Opon
Mariusz Jasik

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