open access

Vol 89, No 10 (2018)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2018-10-31
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A comparison of pelvic organ prolapse and sexual function after abdominal and laparoscopic hysterectomy

Nadiye Koroglu, Berna Aslan Cetin, Aysu Akca, Gokce Turan, Ilkbal Temel Yuksel, Isıl Safak Yıldırım, Gonca Yetkin Yıldırım
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2018.0094
·
Pubmed: 30393843
·
Ginekol Pol 2018;89(10):553-557.

open access

Vol 89, No 10 (2018)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2018-10-31

Abstract

Objectives: Hysterectomy is one of the risk factors of pelvic organ prolapse (POP). There is no consensus on whether the route of hysterectomy affects the subsequent development of POP. The aim of the study was to assess POP and sexual function 1 year after a hysterectomy when comparing total abdominal hysterectomy (TAH) with total laparoscopic hysterectomy (TLH). The study applied the pelvic organ prolapse quantification (POP-Q) as the measure of POP and a short-form of the POP/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Function Questionnaire (PISQ-12).
Material and methods: All patients that underwent either TAH or TLH due to benign causes between March 2016 and March 2017 at the tertiary hospital used for the study were included in our prospective cohort study. POP-Q measurements and PISQ-12 scores were assessed 1 year postoperatively.
Results: We included 182 patients in the clinical examinations. There were no statistically significant differences in demographic characteristics between the TAH and TLH groups. Also, there we no differences observed in the objective POP measurements between the two study groups. Results of the two groups’ PISQ-12 scores were also similar. However, postoperative vaginal lengths were found to be significantly shorter in the patients who had undergone TAH compared with those who had undergone TLH.
Conclusions: TAH and TLH are comparable regarding short-term objective pelvic organ prolapse. Although we found
statistically a significant difference in vaginal lengths between the two groups, no clinical significance was found in terms of sexual function.

Abstract

Objectives: Hysterectomy is one of the risk factors of pelvic organ prolapse (POP). There is no consensus on whether the route of hysterectomy affects the subsequent development of POP. The aim of the study was to assess POP and sexual function 1 year after a hysterectomy when comparing total abdominal hysterectomy (TAH) with total laparoscopic hysterectomy (TLH). The study applied the pelvic organ prolapse quantification (POP-Q) as the measure of POP and a short-form of the POP/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Function Questionnaire (PISQ-12).
Material and methods: All patients that underwent either TAH or TLH due to benign causes between March 2016 and March 2017 at the tertiary hospital used for the study were included in our prospective cohort study. POP-Q measurements and PISQ-12 scores were assessed 1 year postoperatively.
Results: We included 182 patients in the clinical examinations. There were no statistically significant differences in demographic characteristics between the TAH and TLH groups. Also, there we no differences observed in the objective POP measurements between the two study groups. Results of the two groups’ PISQ-12 scores were also similar. However, postoperative vaginal lengths were found to be significantly shorter in the patients who had undergone TAH compared with those who had undergone TLH.
Conclusions: TAH and TLH are comparable regarding short-term objective pelvic organ prolapse. Although we found
statistically a significant difference in vaginal lengths between the two groups, no clinical significance was found in terms of sexual function.

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Keywords

hysterectomy; pelvic organ prolapse; sexual function

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About this article
Title

A comparison of pelvic organ prolapse and sexual function after abdominal and laparoscopic hysterectomy

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 89, No 10 (2018)

Pages

553-557

Published online

2018-10-31

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2018.0094

Pubmed

30393843

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2018;89(10):553-557.

Keywords

hysterectomy
pelvic organ prolapse
sexual function

Authors

Nadiye Koroglu
Berna Aslan Cetin
Aysu Akca
Gokce Turan
Ilkbal Temel Yuksel
Isıl Safak Yıldırım
Gonca Yetkin Yıldırım

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