open access

Vol 89, No 5 (2018)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2018-05-30
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Proteinuria in preeclampsia: is it important?

Attila Özkara, Aşkı Ellibeş Kaya, Alper Başbuğ, Sabri Berkem Ökten, Ozan Doğan, Mete Çağlar, Selahattin Kumru
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2018.0044
·
Pubmed: 30084477
·
Ginekol Pol 2018;89(5):256-261.

open access

Vol 89, No 5 (2018)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2018-05-30

Abstract

Objectives: Our aim is to evaluate the laboratory results and proteinuria levels of preeclamptic women and their relation­ships to maternal and fetal outcomes.

Material and methods: One hundred preeclamptic pregnant women who gave birth in our clinic between 2013 and 2015 were included in our study retrospectively. The data collected from the patients included gestational week, age, gravidity, parity, abortus history, blood pressure, biochemical parameters, delivery method, maternal hospitalization time, cesarean indication, complications, blood products required, plasmapheresis use and dialysis need. The details about the newborns were recorded retrospectively. The relationships between preeclampsia signs and maternal and neonatal out­comes were analyzed. The protein amounts were analyzed via 24-hour collected urine analyses and spot urine analyses.

Results: A statistically significant positive correlation was observed between neonatal intensive care unit needs and pro­teinuria levels. Fetal growth restriction, respiratory distress syndrome and sepsis were observed as the level of proteinuria increased, but the result was not statistically significant. Eclampsia was observed only in patients with massive proteinuria, and it was statistically significant. An increase in cesarean sections, placental abruptions, antihypertensive drug needs and blood product replacement rates was observed as the amount of proteinuria increased in preeclamptic women, but the results were not statistically significant.

Conclusions: The severity of preeclampsia cannot be determined by the level of proteinuria. However, when massive proteinuria is detected, the clinician should be more cautious about maternal and fetal complications.

Abstract

Objectives: Our aim is to evaluate the laboratory results and proteinuria levels of preeclamptic women and their relation­ships to maternal and fetal outcomes.

Material and methods: One hundred preeclamptic pregnant women who gave birth in our clinic between 2013 and 2015 were included in our study retrospectively. The data collected from the patients included gestational week, age, gravidity, parity, abortus history, blood pressure, biochemical parameters, delivery method, maternal hospitalization time, cesarean indication, complications, blood products required, plasmapheresis use and dialysis need. The details about the newborns were recorded retrospectively. The relationships between preeclampsia signs and maternal and neonatal out­comes were analyzed. The protein amounts were analyzed via 24-hour collected urine analyses and spot urine analyses.

Results: A statistically significant positive correlation was observed between neonatal intensive care unit needs and pro­teinuria levels. Fetal growth restriction, respiratory distress syndrome and sepsis were observed as the level of proteinuria increased, but the result was not statistically significant. Eclampsia was observed only in patients with massive proteinuria, and it was statistically significant. An increase in cesarean sections, placental abruptions, antihypertensive drug needs and blood product replacement rates was observed as the amount of proteinuria increased in preeclamptic women, but the results were not statistically significant.

Conclusions: The severity of preeclampsia cannot be determined by the level of proteinuria. However, when massive proteinuria is detected, the clinician should be more cautious about maternal and fetal complications.

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Keywords

Complications, preeclampsia, proteinuria

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About this article
Title

Proteinuria in preeclampsia: is it important?

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 89, No 5 (2018)

Pages

256-261

Published online

2018-05-30

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2018.0044

Pubmed

30084477

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2018;89(5):256-261.

Keywords

Complications
preeclampsia
proteinuria

Authors

Attila Özkara
Aşkı Ellibeş Kaya
Alper Başbuğ
Sabri Berkem Ökten
Ozan Doğan
Mete Çağlar
Selahattin Kumru

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