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Original article
Published online: 2020-09-03
Submitted: 2020-06-11
Accepted: 2020-07-27
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Evaluation of the relationship of maxillary third molar teeth with pterygomaxillary fissure with cephalometric radygraph

S. Sadry, C. G. Koca, I. Kaya
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2020.0112
·
Pubmed: 32896867

open access

Ahead of Print
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2020-09-03
Submitted: 2020-06-11
Accepted: 2020-07-27

Abstract

Background: The aim of this study is to evaluate the relationship between the third molars which are determined to be closely related to pterygomaxillary fissure in cephalometric images.

Materials and methods: The material of this study was panoramic from 200 individuals (101 men, 99 women, mean age 19.02 ± 1.62) with three different skeletal malocclusion in the sagittal direction (Class I, 95; Class II, 85; Class III, 20). and lateral cephalometric radiographs. In the individuals included in the study, the maxillary third molar teeth are impacted unilaterally (n = 121) or bilaterally (n = 49). Angular and millimetric measurements (SNA°, SNB° , ANB°, Ptm [Height-x], Ptm [Width-y]) were made in accordance with the parameters determined on the lateral cephalometric radiographs of individuals. In this retrospective study, the relation of impaction with pterygomaxillary fissure evaluated on cephalometric radiographs, whether the impaction was unilateral or bilateral, was investigated in terms of skeletal anomaly. Mann-Whitney U analysis comparison tests were used to evaluate the groups.

Results: Of the 200 individuals with impacted maxillary third molar females, 110 were female and 90 were male. There is no statistical difference between them in terms of unilateral and bilateral impacted third molars (p> 0.05). Of the 200 patients, 95 patients were Class I, 85 patients were Class II, and 20 patients were Class III. There is no statistical difference between unilateral and bilateral impacted cases in facial skeletal classification (p> 0.05). When the impacted teeth were evaluated as total in the study of 200 individuals, the number 2 sella variation was observed most in the individuals in this study (170/79) (46.5%). This is statistically significant (p <0.001). According to Mann whitney U test results, the relationship between genders and pterygomaxillary fissure variable width and height (Ptm-x and Ptm-y) measurements were not statistically significant (p> 0.05).

Conclusions: The fact that the third molar teeth are impacted bilaterally or unilaterally is not affected by pterygomaxillary fissure change.

Abstract

Background: The aim of this study is to evaluate the relationship between the third molars which are determined to be closely related to pterygomaxillary fissure in cephalometric images.

Materials and methods: The material of this study was panoramic from 200 individuals (101 men, 99 women, mean age 19.02 ± 1.62) with three different skeletal malocclusion in the sagittal direction (Class I, 95; Class II, 85; Class III, 20). and lateral cephalometric radiographs. In the individuals included in the study, the maxillary third molar teeth are impacted unilaterally (n = 121) or bilaterally (n = 49). Angular and millimetric measurements (SNA°, SNB° , ANB°, Ptm [Height-x], Ptm [Width-y]) were made in accordance with the parameters determined on the lateral cephalometric radiographs of individuals. In this retrospective study, the relation of impaction with pterygomaxillary fissure evaluated on cephalometric radiographs, whether the impaction was unilateral or bilateral, was investigated in terms of skeletal anomaly. Mann-Whitney U analysis comparison tests were used to evaluate the groups.

Results: Of the 200 individuals with impacted maxillary third molar females, 110 were female and 90 were male. There is no statistical difference between them in terms of unilateral and bilateral impacted third molars (p> 0.05). Of the 200 patients, 95 patients were Class I, 85 patients were Class II, and 20 patients were Class III. There is no statistical difference between unilateral and bilateral impacted cases in facial skeletal classification (p> 0.05). When the impacted teeth were evaluated as total in the study of 200 individuals, the number 2 sella variation was observed most in the individuals in this study (170/79) (46.5%). This is statistically significant (p <0.001). According to Mann whitney U test results, the relationship between genders and pterygomaxillary fissure variable width and height (Ptm-x and Ptm-y) measurements were not statistically significant (p> 0.05).

Conclusions: The fact that the third molar teeth are impacted bilaterally or unilaterally is not affected by pterygomaxillary fissure change.

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Keywords

cephalometric radiography, maxillary third molar, pterygomaxillary fissure

About this article
Title

Evaluation of the relationship of maxillary third molar teeth with pterygomaxillary fissure with cephalometric radygraph

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Ahead of Print

Article type

Original article

Published online

2020-09-03

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2020.0112

Pubmed

32896867

Keywords

cephalometric radiography
maxillary third molar
pterygomaxillary fissure

Authors

S. Sadry
C. G. Koca
I. Kaya

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