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Case report
Published online: 2020-05-18
Submitted: 2020-03-22
Accepted: 2020-04-29
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Rare combined variations of the celiac trunk, accessory hepatic and gastric arteries with co-occurrence of double cystic arteries: a case report

A. Mazurek, A. Juszczak, J. A. Walocha, A. Pasternak
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2020.0052
·
Pubmed: 32459367

open access

Ahead of Print
CASE REPORTS
Published online: 2020-05-18
Submitted: 2020-03-22
Accepted: 2020-04-29

Abstract

Many variations of the celiac trunk and hepatic or gallbladder arterial supply have been reported before in many cadaveric and radiologic studies. In this case we present combined anomalies observed in dissected cadaver of a 73-years old female. The left gastric artery arises directly from the abdominal aorta and gives two branches: the right inferior phrenic artery in the proximal part and the accessory left hepatic artery in the distal part. The celiac trunk is bifurcated into  the common hepatic artery and the splenic artery. The right gastric artery emerges from the left hepatic artery. The right hepatic artery gives two cystic arteries and the accessory right hepatic artery is noticed arising from the posterior superior pancreaticoduodenal artery. The deep cystic artery and the right inferior phrenic artery give hepatic branches. Also, we noticed small accessory biliary duct going to the cystic duct. This complexity of  the arterial supply with anomaly of the biliary ducts have many surgical implications which will be herein discussed.

Abstract

Many variations of the celiac trunk and hepatic or gallbladder arterial supply have been reported before in many cadaveric and radiologic studies. In this case we present combined anomalies observed in dissected cadaver of a 73-years old female. The left gastric artery arises directly from the abdominal aorta and gives two branches: the right inferior phrenic artery in the proximal part and the accessory left hepatic artery in the distal part. The celiac trunk is bifurcated into  the common hepatic artery and the splenic artery. The right gastric artery emerges from the left hepatic artery. The right hepatic artery gives two cystic arteries and the accessory right hepatic artery is noticed arising from the posterior superior pancreaticoduodenal artery. The deep cystic artery and the right inferior phrenic artery give hepatic branches. Also, we noticed small accessory biliary duct going to the cystic duct. This complexity of  the arterial supply with anomaly of the biliary ducts have many surgical implications which will be herein discussed.

Get Citation

Keywords

anatomical variations, accessory hepatic artery, gastric artery, double cystic arteries, right inferior phrenic artery

About this article
Title

Rare combined variations of the celiac trunk, accessory hepatic and gastric arteries with co-occurrence of double cystic arteries: a case report

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Ahead of Print

Article type

Case report

Published online

2020-05-18

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2020.0052

Pubmed

32459367

Keywords

anatomical variations
accessory hepatic artery
gastric artery
double cystic arteries
right inferior phrenic artery

Authors

A. Mazurek
A. Juszczak
J. A. Walocha
A. Pasternak

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