open access

Vol 79, No 4 (2020)
Original article
Published online: 2020-02-05
Submitted: 2019-12-19
Accepted: 2020-01-29
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Expression and distribution of HIF-1α, HIF-2α, VEGF, VEGFR-2 and HIMF in the kidneys of Tibetan sheep, plain sheep and goat

K. Yang, Z. Zhang, Y. Li, S. Chen, W. Chen, H. Ding, Z. Tan, Z. Ma, Z. Qiao
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2020.0011
·
Pubmed: 32020576
·
Folia Morphol 2020;79(4):748-755.

open access

Vol 79, No 4 (2020)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2020-02-05
Submitted: 2019-12-19
Accepted: 2020-01-29

Abstract

Background: The objective of this study was to detect the expression and distribution characteristics of five proteins (the hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha [HIF-1a], HIF-2a, vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF], VEGF-2 receptor [VEGFR-2] and hypoxia-induced mitogenic factor [HIMF]) in kidney of Tibetan sheep, plain sheep and goat. The results will provide the basic information for the comparative study of sheep breeds living at different altitudes.

Materials and methods:
The kidney tissues were collected from healthy adult Tibetan sheep, plain sheep and goats and made into paraffin sections. Histological characteristics were assessed by haematoxylin and eosin staining. Expressions of HIF-1a, HIF-2a, VEGF, VEGFR-2 and HIMF proteins were measured by immunohistochemical staining.

Results:
Immunohistochemistry results showed that the positive expression signals of HIF-1a, HIF-2a, VEGF and VEGFR-2 were detected in epithelial cells of renal tubules and collecting tubules, renal corpuscles in the kidneys of the three sheep breeds. Positive expression signals of HIMF were detected in epithelial cells of proximal tubules and distal tubules in Tibetan sheep and epithelial cells of distal tubules in goat. Immunostaining intensity of HIF-1a, HIF-2a, VEGF and VEGFR-2 proteins in Tibetan sheep was significantly higher than that in both plain sheep and goat (p < 0.05). Immunostaining intensity of HIMF in Tibetan sheep was higher than goat (p < 0.05). Positive expression signals of HIMF were not detected in plain sheep.

Conclusions:
The expression and distribution characteristics of HIF-1a, HIF-2a, VEGF, VEGFR-2 and HIMF in the studied kidney tissues suggested that these proteins may be related to the physiological regulation of Tibetan sheep kidney in hypoxia environment, and therefore might be important regulating proteins for Tibetan sheep to adapt to high altitude hypoxia environment.

Abstract

Background: The objective of this study was to detect the expression and distribution characteristics of five proteins (the hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha [HIF-1a], HIF-2a, vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF], VEGF-2 receptor [VEGFR-2] and hypoxia-induced mitogenic factor [HIMF]) in kidney of Tibetan sheep, plain sheep and goat. The results will provide the basic information for the comparative study of sheep breeds living at different altitudes.

Materials and methods:
The kidney tissues were collected from healthy adult Tibetan sheep, plain sheep and goats and made into paraffin sections. Histological characteristics were assessed by haematoxylin and eosin staining. Expressions of HIF-1a, HIF-2a, VEGF, VEGFR-2 and HIMF proteins were measured by immunohistochemical staining.

Results:
Immunohistochemistry results showed that the positive expression signals of HIF-1a, HIF-2a, VEGF and VEGFR-2 were detected in epithelial cells of renal tubules and collecting tubules, renal corpuscles in the kidneys of the three sheep breeds. Positive expression signals of HIMF were detected in epithelial cells of proximal tubules and distal tubules in Tibetan sheep and epithelial cells of distal tubules in goat. Immunostaining intensity of HIF-1a, HIF-2a, VEGF and VEGFR-2 proteins in Tibetan sheep was significantly higher than that in both plain sheep and goat (p < 0.05). Immunostaining intensity of HIMF in Tibetan sheep was higher than goat (p < 0.05). Positive expression signals of HIMF were not detected in plain sheep.

Conclusions:
The expression and distribution characteristics of HIF-1a, HIF-2a, VEGF, VEGFR-2 and HIMF in the studied kidney tissues suggested that these proteins may be related to the physiological regulation of Tibetan sheep kidney in hypoxia environment, and therefore might be important regulating proteins for Tibetan sheep to adapt to high altitude hypoxia environment.

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Keywords

HIF-1α, HIF-2α, VEGF, VEGFR-2, HIMF, Tibetan sheep, kidney, immunohistochemistry

About this article
Title

Expression and distribution of HIF-1α, HIF-2α, VEGF, VEGFR-2 and HIMF in the kidneys of Tibetan sheep, plain sheep and goat

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 79, No 4 (2020)

Article type

Original article

Pages

748-755

Published online

2020-02-05

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2020.0011

Pubmed

32020576

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2020;79(4):748-755.

Keywords

HIF-1α
HIF-2α
VEGF
VEGFR-2
HIMF
Tibetan sheep
kidney
immunohistochemistry

Authors

K. Yang
Z. Zhang
Y. Li
S. Chen
W. Chen
H. Ding
Z. Tan
Z. Ma
Z. Qiao

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