open access

Vol 78, No 3 (2019)
REVIEW ARTICLES
Published online: 2019-01-18
Submitted: 2018-12-11
Accepted: 2019-01-15
Get Citation

Anatomical variations of knee ligaments in magnetic resonance imaging: pictorial essay

J. Tomczyk, M. Rachalewski, A. Bianek-Bodzak, M. Domżalski
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2019.0004
·
Pubmed: 30664231
·
Folia Morphol 2019;78(3):467-475.

open access

Vol 78, No 3 (2019)
REVIEW ARTICLES
Published online: 2019-01-18
Submitted: 2018-12-11
Accepted: 2019-01-15

Abstract

Evaluation with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is currently a gold standard for comprehensive posttraumatic assessment of the knee joint. Increasing availability of MR systems with stronger magnetic fields and new sequences results in higher resolution of images and thus allows imaging smaller and finer anatomical details, including different anatomical variations.

This article focuses on anatomical variations of knee ligaments, which can mimics pathological structures. Well-known and less common ligaments that are sporadically observed and may raise the most doubt will be discussed. Familiarity with those variations of ligaments is indispensable for precise MRI reporting to avoid misinterpretation as meniscal tears, loose bodies or mass lesions especially in cases. This paper is addressed to both radiology and orthopaedics specialists. Illustrations show discussed ligaments in standard planes while, for less known ligaments, we add information on how to adjust planes to properly visualise a particular structure, which will hopefully facilitate finding and differentiating those structures in clinical practice.

Abstract

Evaluation with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is currently a gold standard for comprehensive posttraumatic assessment of the knee joint. Increasing availability of MR systems with stronger magnetic fields and new sequences results in higher resolution of images and thus allows imaging smaller and finer anatomical details, including different anatomical variations.

This article focuses on anatomical variations of knee ligaments, which can mimics pathological structures. Well-known and less common ligaments that are sporadically observed and may raise the most doubt will be discussed. Familiarity with those variations of ligaments is indispensable for precise MRI reporting to avoid misinterpretation as meniscal tears, loose bodies or mass lesions especially in cases. This paper is addressed to both radiology and orthopaedics specialists. Illustrations show discussed ligaments in standard planes while, for less known ligaments, we add information on how to adjust planes to properly visualise a particular structure, which will hopefully facilitate finding and differentiating those structures in clinical practice.

Get Citation

Keywords

knee; ligament; anatomical variation; magnetic resonance imaging

About this article
Title

Anatomical variations of knee ligaments in magnetic resonance imaging: pictorial essay

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 78, No 3 (2019)

Pages

467-475

Published online

2019-01-18

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2019.0004

Pubmed

30664231

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2019;78(3):467-475.

Keywords

knee
ligament
anatomical variation
magnetic resonance imaging

Authors

J. Tomczyk
M. Rachalewski
A. Bianek-Bodzak
M. Domżalski

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