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Review article
Submitted: 2023-12-06
Accepted: 2024-03-03
Published online: 2024-03-13
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The twisted Achilles tendon microvasculature

Ivan Szergyuk1, Alicia del Carmen Yika2, Jerzy A. Walocha2, Przemysław A. Pękala23
·
Pubmed: 38512008
Affiliations
  1. Division of Vascular Surgery, Department of Surgery, Addenbrooke’s Hospital, Cambridge University NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge, United Kingdom
  2. Department of Anatomy, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Kraków, Poland
  3. Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Andrzej Frycz Modrzewski Krakow University, Kraków, Poland

open access

Ahead of Print
REVIEW ARTICLES
Submitted: 2023-12-06
Accepted: 2024-03-03
Published online: 2024-03-13

Abstract

The Achilles tendon (AT) is reportedly the most vulnerable to rupture at the midportion, a section of relative hypovascularity. It has been postulated that the twisted structure of this tendon may constitute a critical factor contributing to increased propensity to vascular compromise, decreased regenerative capacity, and rupture in the midsection of the AT. In this review, we will give an overview of the most relevant research on AT vasculature and twist, and delve into the interplay between the two elements in the context of AT disorders. The pertinent body of research suggests a considerable variability in tendon twist among individuals, which likely constitutes a determining factor in the extent to which vessels coursing along and between AT fibers are compressed during contraction-induced elongation of the tendon. Consequently, further research is necessary to investigate the precise association between tendon torsion and blood flow within the AT.

Abstract

The Achilles tendon (AT) is reportedly the most vulnerable to rupture at the midportion, a section of relative hypovascularity. It has been postulated that the twisted structure of this tendon may constitute a critical factor contributing to increased propensity to vascular compromise, decreased regenerative capacity, and rupture in the midsection of the AT. In this review, we will give an overview of the most relevant research on AT vasculature and twist, and delve into the interplay between the two elements in the context of AT disorders. The pertinent body of research suggests a considerable variability in tendon twist among individuals, which likely constitutes a determining factor in the extent to which vessels coursing along and between AT fibers are compressed during contraction-induced elongation of the tendon. Consequently, further research is necessary to investigate the precise association between tendon torsion and blood flow within the AT.

Get Citation

Keywords

Achilles tendon; twist; microvasculature; hypovascularity; tendinopathy

About this article
Title

The twisted Achilles tendon microvasculature

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Ahead of Print

Article type

Review article

Published online

2024-03-13

Page views

116

Article views/downloads

102

DOI

10.5603/fm.98393

Pubmed

38512008

Keywords

Achilles tendon
twist
microvasculature
hypovascularity
tendinopathy

Authors

Ivan Szergyuk
Alicia del Carmen Yika
Jerzy A. Walocha
Przemysław A. Pękala

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