open access

Vol 82, No 2 (2023)
Original article
Submitted: 2022-01-18
Accepted: 2022-03-12
Published online: 2022-03-29
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Morphometric variants of the paranasal sinuses in a Mexican population: expected changes according to age and gender

N. G. Jasso-Ramírez1, R. E. Elizondo-Omaña1, J. L. Treviño-González2, A. Quiroga-Garza34, I. A. Garza-Rico5, K. Aguilar-Morales1, G. Elizondo-Riojas5, S. Guzmán-Lopez1
·
Pubmed: 35380013
·
Folia Morphol 2023;82(2):339-345.
Affiliations
  1. Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, School of Medicine, Human Anatomy Department, Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, Mexico
  2. Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, University Hospital “Dr. José Eleuterio González”, Otorhinolaryngology Department, Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, Mexico
  3. Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, School of Medicine, Human Anatomy Department, Monterrey, Nuevo León, México
  4. Intituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Delegación de Nuevo León. General Sugery. Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, Mexico
  5. Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, University Hospital “Dr. José Eleuterio González”, Radiology and Imaging Department, Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, Mexico

open access

Vol 82, No 2 (2023)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Submitted: 2022-01-18
Accepted: 2022-03-12
Published online: 2022-03-29

Abstract

Background: There are developmental variations in the paranasal sinuses. Our objective was to determine their dimensions and volume stratified by age and sex and define the expected growth pattern. Materials and methods: A retrospective, observational study was performed including computed tomography (CT) of patients between 1 and 20 years of age. The volumes of the frontal, sphenoid, and maxillary sinuses were obtained. Results: A total of 210 CT were included with a mean age of 10 ± 6.1 years, 106 (50.5%) were female. Groups were categorised in ranges of 5 years. Spearman correlation coefficients between the right and left sides were 0.843, 0.711, 0.916 for the frontal, sphenoid and maxillary sinuses. Post-hoc for the categorical age groups demonstrated statistically significant differences with values of p < 0.01, except between age groups 11–15 against ≥ 16 years of age (p = 0.8). Gender-related differences were evident with a higher air volume in girls in the 5–10-year-old group, while boys predominated in the rest of the groups. Conclusions: Computed tomography is ideal for pre-surgical sinus assessment. The maximum volume of paranasal sinuses is reached at the age of 15. There is a clear volumetric difference between age and gender groups. There is a direct relationship between a volume and its contralateral counterpart.

Abstract

Background: There are developmental variations in the paranasal sinuses. Our objective was to determine their dimensions and volume stratified by age and sex and define the expected growth pattern. Materials and methods: A retrospective, observational study was performed including computed tomography (CT) of patients between 1 and 20 years of age. The volumes of the frontal, sphenoid, and maxillary sinuses were obtained. Results: A total of 210 CT were included with a mean age of 10 ± 6.1 years, 106 (50.5%) were female. Groups were categorised in ranges of 5 years. Spearman correlation coefficients between the right and left sides were 0.843, 0.711, 0.916 for the frontal, sphenoid and maxillary sinuses. Post-hoc for the categorical age groups demonstrated statistically significant differences with values of p < 0.01, except between age groups 11–15 against ≥ 16 years of age (p = 0.8). Gender-related differences were evident with a higher air volume in girls in the 5–10-year-old group, while boys predominated in the rest of the groups. Conclusions: Computed tomography is ideal for pre-surgical sinus assessment. The maximum volume of paranasal sinuses is reached at the age of 15. There is a clear volumetric difference between age and gender groups. There is a direct relationship between a volume and its contralateral counterpart.

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Keywords

paranasal sinuses, paediatrics, morphology, age groups, gender

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About this article
Title

Morphometric variants of the paranasal sinuses in a Mexican population: expected changes according to age and gender

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 82, No 2 (2023)

Article type

Original article

Pages

339-345

Published online

2022-03-29

Page views

2343

Article views/downloads

842

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2022.0033

Pubmed

35380013

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2023;82(2):339-345.

Keywords

paranasal sinuses
paediatrics
morphology
age groups
gender

Authors

N. G. Jasso-Ramírez
R. E. Elizondo-Omaña
J. L. Treviño-González
A. Quiroga-Garza
I. A. Garza-Rico
K. Aguilar-Morales
G. Elizondo-Riojas
S. Guzmán-Lopez

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