open access

Vol 58, No 2 (2020)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2020-06-30
Submitted: 2019-12-10
Accepted: 2020-06-18
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Expression of angiogenic factor with G patch and FHA domains 1 (AGGF1) in placenta from patients with preeclampsia

Lan-fen An, Shu-qi Chi, Jun Zhang, Hong-bo Wang, Wei-xiang Ouyang
DOI: 10.5603/FHC.a2020.0016
·
Pubmed: 32602552
·
Folia Histochem Cytobiol 2020;58(2):83-89.

open access

Vol 58, No 2 (2020)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2020-06-30
Submitted: 2019-12-10
Accepted: 2020-06-18

Abstract

Introduction. Preeclampsia (PE) is a major contributor to maternal and foetal morbidity and mortality worldwide. It manifests as high blood pressure and proteinuria in women at more than 20 weeks of gestation. Abnormal levels of anti- and pro-angiogenesis factors are known to be associated with PE. In the present study, we aimed to determine the localisation of angiogenic factor with G patch and FHA domains 1 (AGGF1) in the placenta and to compare the expression levels of AGGF1 in the third-trimester placentas of preeclamptic and normotensive pregnancies.

Materials and methods. Placental tissue samples were collected from women with PE (n = 28) and without PE (n = 28). The normotensive controls without PE were matched for gestational age at delivery with the patients with PE. The expression levels of AGGF1 in the placental tissues were evaluated using immunohistochemistry, quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blot.

Results. The immunoexpression of AGGF1 was localised in the syncytiotrophoblast tissue. Notable, the mRNA and protein expression levels of AGGF1 were decreased in preeclamptic placentas as compared with the normotensive control group (P < 0.05).

Discussion. Our results suggest that the decreased AGGF1 in preeclamptic placentas may be related to the
pathogenesis of preeclampsia.

Abstract

Introduction. Preeclampsia (PE) is a major contributor to maternal and foetal morbidity and mortality worldwide. It manifests as high blood pressure and proteinuria in women at more than 20 weeks of gestation. Abnormal levels of anti- and pro-angiogenesis factors are known to be associated with PE. In the present study, we aimed to determine the localisation of angiogenic factor with G patch and FHA domains 1 (AGGF1) in the placenta and to compare the expression levels of AGGF1 in the third-trimester placentas of preeclamptic and normotensive pregnancies.

Materials and methods. Placental tissue samples were collected from women with PE (n = 28) and without PE (n = 28). The normotensive controls without PE were matched for gestational age at delivery with the patients with PE. The expression levels of AGGF1 in the placental tissues were evaluated using immunohistochemistry, quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blot.

Results. The immunoexpression of AGGF1 was localised in the syncytiotrophoblast tissue. Notable, the mRNA and protein expression levels of AGGF1 were decreased in preeclamptic placentas as compared with the normotensive control group (P < 0.05).

Discussion. Our results suggest that the decreased AGGF1 in preeclamptic placentas may be related to the
pathogenesis of preeclampsia.

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Keywords

angiogenesis; AGGF1; preeclampsia; placenta; syncytiotrophoblast; IHC, qPCR, WB

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About this article
Title

Expression of angiogenic factor with G patch and FHA domains 1 (AGGF1) in placenta from patients with preeclampsia

Journal

Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica

Issue

Vol 58, No 2 (2020)

Pages

83-89

Published online

2020-06-30

DOI

10.5603/FHC.a2020.0016

Pubmed

32602552

Bibliographic record

Folia Histochem Cytobiol 2020;58(2):83-89.

Keywords

angiogenesis
AGGF1
preeclampsia
placenta
syncytiotrophoblast
IHC
qPCR
WB

Authors

Lan-fen An
Shu-qi Chi
Jun Zhang
Hong-bo Wang
Wei-xiang Ouyang

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