open access

Vol 44, No 2 (2006)
Original paper
Submitted: 2011-12-19
Published online: 2006-06-30
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Contribution of stem cells to skeletal muscle regeneration.

Jerzy Kawiak, Edyta Brzóska, Iwona Grabowska, Grazyna Hoser, Władysława Stremińska, Danuta Wasilewska, Eugeniusz Krzysztof Machaj, Zygmunt Pojda, Jerzy Moraczewski
Folia Histochem Cytobiol 2006;44(2):75-79.

open access

Vol 44, No 2 (2006)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Submitted: 2011-12-19
Published online: 2006-06-30

Abstract

Stem cells for skeletal muscle originate from dermomyotome of the embryo. The early marker of these cells is expression of both transcription factors Pax3 and Pax7 (Pax3+/Pax7+ cells). The skeletal muscles in the adult organism have a remarkable ability to regenerate. Skeletal muscle damage induces degenerative phase, followed by activation of inflammatory and satellite cells. The satellite cells are quiescent myogenic precursor cells located between the basal membrane and the sarcolemma of myofiber and they are characterized by Pax7 expression. Activation of the satellite cells is regulated by muscle growth and chemokines. Apart from the satellite cells, a population of adult stem cells (muscle side population--mSP) exists in the skeletal muscles. Moreover, the cells trafficking from different tissues may be involved in the regeneration of damaged muscle. Trafficking of cells in the process of damaged muscle regeneration may be traced in the SCID mice.

Abstract

Stem cells for skeletal muscle originate from dermomyotome of the embryo. The early marker of these cells is expression of both transcription factors Pax3 and Pax7 (Pax3+/Pax7+ cells). The skeletal muscles in the adult organism have a remarkable ability to regenerate. Skeletal muscle damage induces degenerative phase, followed by activation of inflammatory and satellite cells. The satellite cells are quiescent myogenic precursor cells located between the basal membrane and the sarcolemma of myofiber and they are characterized by Pax7 expression. Activation of the satellite cells is regulated by muscle growth and chemokines. Apart from the satellite cells, a population of adult stem cells (muscle side population--mSP) exists in the skeletal muscles. Moreover, the cells trafficking from different tissues may be involved in the regeneration of damaged muscle. Trafficking of cells in the process of damaged muscle regeneration may be traced in the SCID mice.
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About this article
Title

Contribution of stem cells to skeletal muscle regeneration.

Journal

Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica

Issue

Vol 44, No 2 (2006)

Article type

Original paper

Pages

75-79

Published online

2006-06-30

Bibliographic record

Folia Histochem Cytobiol 2006;44(2):75-79.

Authors

Jerzy Kawiak
Edyta Brzóska
Iwona Grabowska
Grazyna Hoser
Władysława Stremińska
Danuta Wasilewska
Eugeniusz Krzysztof Machaj
Zygmunt Pojda
Jerzy Moraczewski

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