open access

Vol 12, No 1 (2017)
Research paper
Published online: 2016-12-12
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The Adherence in Chronic Diseases Scale — a new tool to monitor implementation of a treatment plan

Aldona Kubica, Agata Kosobucka, Piotr Michalski, Łukasz Pietrzykowski, Aleksandra Jurek, Marzena Wawrzyniak, Michał Kasprzak
DOI: 10.5603/FC.a2016.0105
·
Folia Cardiologica 2017;12(1):19-26.

open access

Vol 12, No 1 (2017)
Original Papers
Published online: 2016-12-12

Abstract

Introduction. The aim of this study was to assess adherence to treatment with use of the new scale in a population of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) after myocardial infarction (MI) with respect to some socio-demographic and clinical factors.

Material and methods. The study was conducted in a population of 100 consecutive patients (40 women, 60 men) aged from 30 to 88 years (mean 63.4), six months after hospitalization for MI.

Results. The results of the assessment with the Adherence in Chronic Diseases Scale (ACDS) comprise between 6 and 28 points; median 24 points (21–28). Twenty-four patients had high score (> 26 pts.), 53 patients had intermediate score (between 21–26 pts.) and 23 — low score (< 21 pts.). For optimal model of multiple regression, the correlation coefficient R was 0.539; and the adjusted coefficient of determination R2 = 0.26, p = 0.000002. Independent factors affecting adherence according to the ACDS scale were: subjective assessment of health status (b = 0.48 ± ± 0.23, p = 0.036), age of the respondents (b = –0.11 ± 0.04, p = 0.004), more than one hospitalization due to CAD (b = –1.78 ± 0.87, p = 0.044), and diabetes mellitus (b = –2.02 ± 0.91, p = 0.029).

Conclusions. Subjective assessment of health status, age of patients, the number of hospitalizations due to CAD and diabetes affect the adherence in the course of long-term treatment after myocardial infarction.  

Abstract

Introduction. The aim of this study was to assess adherence to treatment with use of the new scale in a population of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) after myocardial infarction (MI) with respect to some socio-demographic and clinical factors.

Material and methods. The study was conducted in a population of 100 consecutive patients (40 women, 60 men) aged from 30 to 88 years (mean 63.4), six months after hospitalization for MI.

Results. The results of the assessment with the Adherence in Chronic Diseases Scale (ACDS) comprise between 6 and 28 points; median 24 points (21–28). Twenty-four patients had high score (> 26 pts.), 53 patients had intermediate score (between 21–26 pts.) and 23 — low score (< 21 pts.). For optimal model of multiple regression, the correlation coefficient R was 0.539; and the adjusted coefficient of determination R2 = 0.26, p = 0.000002. Independent factors affecting adherence according to the ACDS scale were: subjective assessment of health status (b = 0.48 ± ± 0.23, p = 0.036), age of the respondents (b = –0.11 ± 0.04, p = 0.004), more than one hospitalization due to CAD (b = –1.78 ± 0.87, p = 0.044), and diabetes mellitus (b = –2.02 ± 0.91, p = 0.029).

Conclusions. Subjective assessment of health status, age of patients, the number of hospitalizations due to CAD and diabetes affect the adherence in the course of long-term treatment after myocardial infarction.  

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Keywords

adherence scale, coronary artery disease

About this article
Title

The Adherence in Chronic Diseases Scale — a new tool to monitor implementation of a treatment plan

Journal

Folia Cardiologica

Issue

Vol 12, No 1 (2017)

Article type

Research paper

Pages

19-26

Published online

2016-12-12

DOI

10.5603/FC.a2016.0105

Bibliographic record

Folia Cardiologica 2017;12(1):19-26.

Keywords

adherence scale
coronary artery disease

Authors

Aldona Kubica
Agata Kosobucka
Piotr Michalski
Łukasz Pietrzykowski
Aleksandra Jurek
Marzena Wawrzyniak
Michał Kasprzak

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