open access

Vol 15, No 1 (2020)
Original Papers
Published online: 2020-02-27
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Rationale for motivational interventions as pivotal element of multilevel educational and motivational project (MEDMOTION)

Aldona Kubica, Anna Bączkowska
DOI: 10.5603/FC.2020.0003
·
Folia Cardiologica 2020;15(1):6-10.

open access

Vol 15, No 1 (2020)
Original Papers
Published online: 2020-02-27

Abstract

Introduction. The Multilevel EDucational and MOtivational intervention in patients after myocardial infarcTION (MEDMOTION) project has been designed to test the comprehensive strategy of treatment after acute coronary syndrome. The aim of MEDMOTION is to improve the efficacy of secondary prevention, complementing patients’ education with motivational interventions. Material and methods. Individualised motivation and complex health education, started during hospitalisation and continued after discharge, explaining the pathophysiology and symptoms of the disease, elucidating goals and potential benefits of treatment, and highlighting the risk of premature termination of therapy, with the use of additional methods helping patients to remember the treatment schedule, will be applied to enhance adherence to treatment, resulting in improved clinical outcomes. Interventions targeting the attitudes and knowledge of nurses and physicians form part of the MEDMOTION project, including analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of medical staff in the context of motivation and therapeutic education, workshops on interpersonal (medical staff and patient) communication, motivational and educational strategies. Conclusion. We believe that motivational actions, complementing educational interventions, are essential for successful secondary prevention after ACS.

Abstract

Introduction. The Multilevel EDucational and MOtivational intervention in patients after myocardial infarcTION (MEDMOTION) project has been designed to test the comprehensive strategy of treatment after acute coronary syndrome. The aim of MEDMOTION is to improve the efficacy of secondary prevention, complementing patients’ education with motivational interventions. Material and methods. Individualised motivation and complex health education, started during hospitalisation and continued after discharge, explaining the pathophysiology and symptoms of the disease, elucidating goals and potential benefits of treatment, and highlighting the risk of premature termination of therapy, with the use of additional methods helping patients to remember the treatment schedule, will be applied to enhance adherence to treatment, resulting in improved clinical outcomes. Interventions targeting the attitudes and knowledge of nurses and physicians form part of the MEDMOTION project, including analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of medical staff in the context of motivation and therapeutic education, workshops on interpersonal (medical staff and patient) communication, motivational and educational strategies. Conclusion. We believe that motivational actions, complementing educational interventions, are essential for successful secondary prevention after ACS.
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Keywords

motivation, education

About this article
Title

Rationale for motivational interventions as pivotal element of multilevel educational and motivational project (MEDMOTION)

Journal

Folia Cardiologica

Issue

Vol 15, No 1 (2020)

Pages

6-10

Published online

2020-02-27

DOI

10.5603/FC.2020.0003

Bibliographic record

Folia Cardiologica 2020;15(1):6-10.

Keywords

motivation
education

Authors

Aldona Kubica
Anna Bączkowska

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