open access

Vol 13, No 2 (2018)
Young Cardiology
Published online: 2018-05-30
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Beneficial effect of antihypertensive therapy on exercise capacity assessed by a 6-minute walk test at one year follow-up

Małgorzata Kurpaska, Paweł Krzesiński, Grzegorz Gielerak, Adam Stańczyk, Katarzyna Piotrowicz, Beata Uziębło-Życzkowska, Andrzej Skrobowski
DOI: 10.5603/FC.2018.0024
·
Folia Cardiologica 2018;13(2):128-136.

open access

Vol 13, No 2 (2018)
Young Cardiology
Published online: 2018-05-30

Abstract

Introduction. Individual variation of exercise tolerance may be clinically important even in asymptomatic patients with arterial hypertension (HTN). The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of antihypertensive therapy on exercise capacity assessed by a 6-minute walk test (6-MWT) and its relation to selected clinical and hemodynamic parameters.

Material and methods. In a group of 111 hypertensive patients without symptoms of heart failure, the change in 6-MWT distance (d_6-MWT) after 12 months of antihypertensive therapy was assessed in relation to their clinical status and hemodynamic parameters, assessed by echocardiography, impedance cardiography, and applanation tonometry.

Results. In the overall study group, antihypertensive therapy was associated with a significant increase in the mean
d_6-MWT (592.9 ± 72.8 vs 613.4 ± 66.0 m, P = 0.030). The change in d_6-MWT depended on baseline values, with the most significant improvement (mean by 63.4 m) observed in patients with initially lowest d_6-MWT (bottom quartile, < 530 m). No statistically significant correlations were found between d_6-MWT and changes in clinical and hemodynamic parameters. However, trends were noted towards positive associations between d_6-MWT and an echocardiographic indicator of left ventricular filling pressure (E/e’), left ventricular ejection fraction, and stroke index.

Conclusions. Antihypertensive therapy improves exercise capacity in hypertensives with initially reduced exercise capacity, and this effect may be related to positive changes in the left ventricular systolic and diastolic function.

Abstract

Introduction. Individual variation of exercise tolerance may be clinically important even in asymptomatic patients with arterial hypertension (HTN). The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of antihypertensive therapy on exercise capacity assessed by a 6-minute walk test (6-MWT) and its relation to selected clinical and hemodynamic parameters.

Material and methods. In a group of 111 hypertensive patients without symptoms of heart failure, the change in 6-MWT distance (d_6-MWT) after 12 months of antihypertensive therapy was assessed in relation to their clinical status and hemodynamic parameters, assessed by echocardiography, impedance cardiography, and applanation tonometry.

Results. In the overall study group, antihypertensive therapy was associated with a significant increase in the mean
d_6-MWT (592.9 ± 72.8 vs 613.4 ± 66.0 m, P = 0.030). The change in d_6-MWT depended on baseline values, with the most significant improvement (mean by 63.4 m) observed in patients with initially lowest d_6-MWT (bottom quartile, < 530 m). No statistically significant correlations were found between d_6-MWT and changes in clinical and hemodynamic parameters. However, trends were noted towards positive associations between d_6-MWT and an echocardiographic indicator of left ventricular filling pressure (E/e’), left ventricular ejection fraction, and stroke index.

Conclusions. Antihypertensive therapy improves exercise capacity in hypertensives with initially reduced exercise capacity, and this effect may be related to positive changes in the left ventricular systolic and diastolic function.

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Keywords

impedance cardiography, applanation tonometry, hypertension, left ventricular diastolic dysfunction, 6-minute walk test

About this article
Title

Beneficial effect of antihypertensive therapy on exercise capacity assessed by a 6-minute walk test at one year follow-up

Journal

Folia Cardiologica

Issue

Vol 13, No 2 (2018)

Pages

128-136

Published online

2018-05-30

DOI

10.5603/FC.2018.0024

Bibliographic record

Folia Cardiologica 2018;13(2):128-136.

Keywords

impedance cardiography
applanation tonometry
hypertension
left ventricular diastolic dysfunction
6-minute walk test

Authors

Małgorzata Kurpaska
Paweł Krzesiński
Grzegorz Gielerak
Adam Stańczyk
Katarzyna Piotrowicz
Beata Uziębło-Życzkowska
Andrzej Skrobowski

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