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Vol 12, No 6 (2017)
Original Papers
Published online: 2017-12-29
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Evaluation of the prognostic value of selected ergospirometric parameters in patients with chronic systolic heart failure pre-qualified for heart transplantation in the 12-month follow-up

Jarosław Pietrzak, Wojciech Gilewski, Danuta Karasek, Jan Błażejewski, Robert Bujak, Joanna Banach, Władysław Sinkiewicz
DOI: 10.5603/FC.2017.0105
·
Folia Cardiologica 2017;12(6):551-556.

open access

Vol 12, No 6 (2017)
Original Papers
Published online: 2017-12-29

Abstract

Introduction. Despite recent advances in diagnosis and pharmacological treatment of cardiovascular diseases, chronic heart failure (HF) carries a poor prognosis. The identification of patients at highest risk for early death from HF is of special importance. Ergospirometric test is known to be useful in predicting survival and oxygen consumption (maximal/peak VO2) and minute ventilation-carbon dioxide production relationship (VE/VCO2slope) are the most frequently analyzed cardiopulmonary exercise test parameters. The aim of this study was to assess the ability of peak VO2 and VE/VCO2slope to predict cardiac-related mortality and cardiac-related hospitalization (MACE, major adverse cardiac event) in patients with chronic systolic HF, pre-qualified for heart transplantation. Material and methods. Forty-five patients (38 men; age 50 ± 8 years) with stable chronic HF (21 coronary artery disease, 24 dilated cardiomyopathy), in New York Heart Association functional class II (n. 16)–III (n. 29), with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) below 35% (mean LVEF = 22.7 ± 5.1%), underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing between 2006 and 2012 year. Results. At the end of follow-up, 5 (11%) patients had died and 17 (38%) had a hospitalization due to CHF exacerbation. Peak VO2 was 14.5 ± 5.7 mL/kg/min, VE/VCO2 slope was 35.1 ± 6.1. MACE(+) group had a lower peak VO2 (13.9 ± 6.9 mL/kg/min vs 15.1 ± 4.3, p = NS) and higher VE/VCO2slope (37.2 + 6.0 vs. 33.1 ± 5.6, p = 0.021) than MACE(–) group. MACE(+) death group had a lower peak VO2 than MACE(–) group (10.9 ± 1.3 vs. 15.1 ± 4.3, p = 0.045). The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves for predicting MACE at 1 year were 0.68 for peak VO2 and 0.70 for VE/VCO2slope. The results of Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed a 1-year MACE free survival of 33% in patients with VE/VCO2slope > 34.9 and 67% in those with VE/VCO2slope < 34.9 (p = 0.0562) and 20% in patients with peak VO2 < 11.6 mL/kg/min and 67% in those with peak VO2 > 11.9 mL/kg/min (p = 0.0085). Conclusions. Both VO2 and VE/VCO2slope, are good prognostic parameters for serious cardiovascular events and improve the risk stratification of chronic HF patients.

Abstract

Introduction. Despite recent advances in diagnosis and pharmacological treatment of cardiovascular diseases, chronic heart failure (HF) carries a poor prognosis. The identification of patients at highest risk for early death from HF is of special importance. Ergospirometric test is known to be useful in predicting survival and oxygen consumption (maximal/peak VO2) and minute ventilation-carbon dioxide production relationship (VE/VCO2slope) are the most frequently analyzed cardiopulmonary exercise test parameters. The aim of this study was to assess the ability of peak VO2 and VE/VCO2slope to predict cardiac-related mortality and cardiac-related hospitalization (MACE, major adverse cardiac event) in patients with chronic systolic HF, pre-qualified for heart transplantation. Material and methods. Forty-five patients (38 men; age 50 ± 8 years) with stable chronic HF (21 coronary artery disease, 24 dilated cardiomyopathy), in New York Heart Association functional class II (n. 16)–III (n. 29), with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) below 35% (mean LVEF = 22.7 ± 5.1%), underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing between 2006 and 2012 year. Results. At the end of follow-up, 5 (11%) patients had died and 17 (38%) had a hospitalization due to CHF exacerbation. Peak VO2 was 14.5 ± 5.7 mL/kg/min, VE/VCO2 slope was 35.1 ± 6.1. MACE(+) group had a lower peak VO2 (13.9 ± 6.9 mL/kg/min vs 15.1 ± 4.3, p = NS) and higher VE/VCO2slope (37.2 + 6.0 vs. 33.1 ± 5.6, p = 0.021) than MACE(–) group. MACE(+) death group had a lower peak VO2 than MACE(–) group (10.9 ± 1.3 vs. 15.1 ± 4.3, p = 0.045). The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves for predicting MACE at 1 year were 0.68 for peak VO2 and 0.70 for VE/VCO2slope. The results of Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed a 1-year MACE free survival of 33% in patients with VE/VCO2slope > 34.9 and 67% in those with VE/VCO2slope < 34.9 (p = 0.0562) and 20% in patients with peak VO2 < 11.6 mL/kg/min and 67% in those with peak VO2 > 11.9 mL/kg/min (p = 0.0085). Conclusions. Both VO2 and VE/VCO2slope, are good prognostic parameters for serious cardiovascular events and improve the risk stratification of chronic HF patients.
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Keywords

cardiopulmonary exercise testing, prognosis, chronic heart failure

About this article
Title

Evaluation of the prognostic value of selected ergospirometric parameters in patients with chronic systolic heart failure pre-qualified for heart transplantation in the 12-month follow-up

Journal

Folia Cardiologica

Issue

Vol 12, No 6 (2017)

Pages

551-556

Published online

2017-12-29

DOI

10.5603/FC.2017.0105

Bibliographic record

Folia Cardiologica 2017;12(6):551-556.

Keywords

cardiopulmonary exercise testing
prognosis
chronic heart failure

Authors

Jarosław Pietrzak
Wojciech Gilewski
Danuta Karasek
Jan Błażejewski
Robert Bujak
Joanna Banach
Władysław Sinkiewicz

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