open access

Vol 12, No 4 (2017)
Young Cardiology
Published online: 2017-09-19
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Frailty of patients scheduled for cardiac surgery — a pilot study

Agnieszka Wiórek, Milena Stankiewicz, Anetta Kowalczuk-Wieteska, Łukasz J. Krzych
DOI: 10.5603/FC.2017.0067
·
Folia Cardiologica 2017;12(4):349-354.

open access

Vol 12, No 4 (2017)
Young Cardiology
Published online: 2017-09-19

Abstract

Introduction. Frailty has been recently approved in many surgical fields as the acknowledged preoperative predictor of adverse postoperative complications. Several methods are available to assess frailty assessment which focus on different patient-related data. The aims of the study were: 1) to verify whether frailty may predict early postoperative complications in cardiac surgery; and 2) to investigate the agreement between objective and subjective assessment of frailty.

Material and methods. This prospective study included 54 consecutive patients (32 men; median age 75 years) hospitalized between December 2015 and February 2016. Frailty was assessed using the Edmonton Frail Scale (EFS, subjective tool) and the Modified Frailty Index (MFI, objective tool). Complications were evaluated based on medical records.

Results. The median EFS was 6 (IQR 5–7) points. Frailty was observed in 15% and vulnerability in 49% of subjects. The median MFI was 0.45 (IQR 0.36–0.56). We found a weak correlation between frailty and the length of hospital stay (EFS: r = 0.22; P = 0.1; MFI: r = 0.324; P = 0.02). Neither tools could predict the occurrence of postoperative complications (EFS: AUROC = 0.602; 95% CI 0.459–0.732; P = 0.2; MFI: AUROC = 0.532; 95% CI 0.389–0.670; P = 0.2). We found no correlation between EFS and MFI (r = 0.05, P = 0.7).

Conclusions. Although many elderly cardiac surgical patients are at risk of frailty, none of the evaluated methods could predict postoperative complications. Available diagnostic tools to assess frailty cannot be used interchangeably. Subjective assessment (by a patient) should be verified by objective evaluation (by a treating physician) and conclusions should be drawn based on the overall clinical picture.

Abstract

Introduction. Frailty has been recently approved in many surgical fields as the acknowledged preoperative predictor of adverse postoperative complications. Several methods are available to assess frailty assessment which focus on different patient-related data. The aims of the study were: 1) to verify whether frailty may predict early postoperative complications in cardiac surgery; and 2) to investigate the agreement between objective and subjective assessment of frailty.

Material and methods. This prospective study included 54 consecutive patients (32 men; median age 75 years) hospitalized between December 2015 and February 2016. Frailty was assessed using the Edmonton Frail Scale (EFS, subjective tool) and the Modified Frailty Index (MFI, objective tool). Complications were evaluated based on medical records.

Results. The median EFS was 6 (IQR 5–7) points. Frailty was observed in 15% and vulnerability in 49% of subjects. The median MFI was 0.45 (IQR 0.36–0.56). We found a weak correlation between frailty and the length of hospital stay (EFS: r = 0.22; P = 0.1; MFI: r = 0.324; P = 0.02). Neither tools could predict the occurrence of postoperative complications (EFS: AUROC = 0.602; 95% CI 0.459–0.732; P = 0.2; MFI: AUROC = 0.532; 95% CI 0.389–0.670; P = 0.2). We found no correlation between EFS and MFI (r = 0.05, P = 0.7).

Conclusions. Although many elderly cardiac surgical patients are at risk of frailty, none of the evaluated methods could predict postoperative complications. Available diagnostic tools to assess frailty cannot be used interchangeably. Subjective assessment (by a patient) should be verified by objective evaluation (by a treating physician) and conclusions should be drawn based on the overall clinical picture.

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Keywords

frailty, elderly, Edmonton Frailty Scale, Modified Frailty Index, cardiac surgery

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About this article
Title

Frailty of patients scheduled for cardiac surgery — a pilot study

Journal

Folia Cardiologica

Issue

Vol 12, No 4 (2017)

Pages

349-354

Published online

2017-09-19

DOI

10.5603/FC.2017.0067

Bibliographic record

Folia Cardiologica 2017;12(4):349-354.

Keywords

frailty
elderly
Edmonton Frailty Scale
Modified Frailty Index
cardiac surgery

Authors

Agnieszka Wiórek
Milena Stankiewicz
Anetta Kowalczuk-Wieteska
Łukasz J. Krzych

References (14)
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