open access

Vol 12, No 3 (2017)
Original Papers
Published online: 2017-06-30
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Assessment of the Hand Grip test usefulness in early prophylactics of arterial hypertension in junior high school students in the region of south-east Poland — a cross-sectional study

Zdzisława Ewa Chmiel, Monika Binkowska-Bury, Paweł Januszewicz, Artur Mazur
DOI: 10.5603/FC.2017.0050
·
Folia Cardiologica 2017;12(3):231-238.

open access

Vol 12, No 3 (2017)
Original Papers
Published online: 2017-06-30

Abstract

Introduction. It is assessed that the increased reaction of arterial pressure to physical exertion occurs in about 20% of healthy young people and it is connected with hyperkinetic reaction of the circulatory system. Early identifi cation in young people may be of vital importance in early prophylactics and treatment of arterial hypertension (HT). The aim was to assess the relation between the use of the Hand Grip Test (HGT) and early diagnosis of the primary arterial hypertension (PHT) in youth aged 16–19.
Material and method. Research was carried out using a survey questionnaire among 511 people aged 16–19 and their parents. The surveyed youth had blood pressure measured in various conditions, including after a provocative stimulus — HGT. In the statistical study we used the ANOVA single factor analysis of variance, χ2 independence test, the V-Kramer test, the tau-b Kendall test and the method: percentages (%), arithmetical average (X) and standard deviation (SD).
Results. Increased pressure rise after HGT test regarded more frequently the systolic aspect (34.8%) rather than the diastolic aspect (7.0%) (p < 0.001). Increased response of systolic blood pressure was observed more frequently in persons with its elevated, rather than normal values (p < 0.05). Increased response for both systolic and diastolic blood pressure was found in persons with a high HT intensity history in the family more often than in youth with low hyper intensity or no propensity towards HT, with predominance of systolic pressure (p < 0.01 vs. p < 0.05).

Conclusions. Our research shows that the HGT, which is used to detect hyper reactivity of the circulatory system, is a viable method for identifi cation of people susceptible to PHT. The application of the test may result in the lowered costs of treatment of people suffering from a hypertension disease.

Abstract

Introduction. It is assessed that the increased reaction of arterial pressure to physical exertion occurs in about 20% of healthy young people and it is connected with hyperkinetic reaction of the circulatory system. Early identifi cation in young people may be of vital importance in early prophylactics and treatment of arterial hypertension (HT). The aim was to assess the relation between the use of the Hand Grip Test (HGT) and early diagnosis of the primary arterial hypertension (PHT) in youth aged 16–19.
Material and method. Research was carried out using a survey questionnaire among 511 people aged 16–19 and their parents. The surveyed youth had blood pressure measured in various conditions, including after a provocative stimulus — HGT. In the statistical study we used the ANOVA single factor analysis of variance, χ2 independence test, the V-Kramer test, the tau-b Kendall test and the method: percentages (%), arithmetical average (X) and standard deviation (SD).
Results. Increased pressure rise after HGT test regarded more frequently the systolic aspect (34.8%) rather than the diastolic aspect (7.0%) (p < 0.001). Increased response of systolic blood pressure was observed more frequently in persons with its elevated, rather than normal values (p < 0.05). Increased response for both systolic and diastolic blood pressure was found in persons with a high HT intensity history in the family more often than in youth with low hyper intensity or no propensity towards HT, with predominance of systolic pressure (p < 0.01 vs. p < 0.05).

Conclusions. Our research shows that the HGT, which is used to detect hyper reactivity of the circulatory system, is a viable method for identifi cation of people susceptible to PHT. The application of the test may result in the lowered costs of treatment of people suffering from a hypertension disease.

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Keywords

hyperkinetic reaction of circulatory system, Hand Grip Test, youth, arterial hypertension

About this article
Title

Assessment of the Hand Grip test usefulness in early prophylactics of arterial hypertension in junior high school students in the region of south-east Poland — a cross-sectional study

Journal

Folia Cardiologica

Issue

Vol 12, No 3 (2017)

Pages

231-238

Published online

2017-06-30

DOI

10.5603/FC.2017.0050

Bibliographic record

Folia Cardiologica 2017;12(3):231-238.

Keywords

hyperkinetic reaction of circulatory system
Hand Grip Test
youth
arterial hypertension

Authors

Zdzisława Ewa Chmiel
Monika Binkowska-Bury
Paweł Januszewicz
Artur Mazur

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