open access

Vol 12, No 2 (2017)
Review Papers
Published online: 2017-04-20
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Yoga and Cardiac Rehabilitation (Yoga-CaRe) in post-acute coronary syndrome patients

Santosh Kumar Sinha, Vinay Krishna, Vikas Mishra, Karandeep Singh, Ashutosh Kumar, Mukesh Jitendra Jha, Mahmadula Razi, Mohammad Asif, Nasar Abdali, Ramesh Thakur, Chandra Mohan Varma
DOI: 10.5603/FC.2017.0026
·
Folia Cardiologica 2017;12(2):179-186.

open access

Vol 12, No 2 (2017)
Review Papers
Published online: 2017-04-20

Abstract

Cardiovascular diseases are a leading cause of death and disability in Asian Indians with huge psychological and economic impact as it affects population in thirty- and forty-year-olds, previously healthy adults and most productive social group. Successful transcatheter therapeutics has opened a new vista for its management; however, it cannot prevent its recurrence. Therefore, secondary prevention is cornerstone of management. Yoga-based Cardiac Rehabilitation (Yoga-CaRe) is a multifaceted approach targeting patient’s physical, psychological, social and occupational status, preventing or delaying the progression of underlying disease and reducing the risk of recurrent rehospitalization and death as well as enabling the patients to live a comfortable and active life. Yoga is an ancient Indian system of philosophy; a mind-body discipline encompassing an array of philosophical precepts, mental attitudes and physical practice. Of seven major branches of yoga, Hatha yoga, which itself includes many different styles (e.g. Iyenger, Ashtanga, etc.), is probably the most commonly recognized, and incorporates elements of physical poses, breath control and meditation, and self-restraint (including that of diet, smoking, alcohol intake and sleep patterns). A Cochrane review reported a 27% reduction in total mortality and 19% reduction in total mortality and non-fatal cardiac events with cardiac rehabilitation (CR), comparing favorably to effective pharmacological treatments (e.g. antiplatelets, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, statins and beta-blockers). Yoga, therefore, could provide a useful frame work on which to develop an economical CR program, with additional advantages of being culturally appropriate to Indians and potentially be appealing to global population.

Abstract

Cardiovascular diseases are a leading cause of death and disability in Asian Indians with huge psychological and economic impact as it affects population in thirty- and forty-year-olds, previously healthy adults and most productive social group. Successful transcatheter therapeutics has opened a new vista for its management; however, it cannot prevent its recurrence. Therefore, secondary prevention is cornerstone of management. Yoga-based Cardiac Rehabilitation (Yoga-CaRe) is a multifaceted approach targeting patient’s physical, psychological, social and occupational status, preventing or delaying the progression of underlying disease and reducing the risk of recurrent rehospitalization and death as well as enabling the patients to live a comfortable and active life. Yoga is an ancient Indian system of philosophy; a mind-body discipline encompassing an array of philosophical precepts, mental attitudes and physical practice. Of seven major branches of yoga, Hatha yoga, which itself includes many different styles (e.g. Iyenger, Ashtanga, etc.), is probably the most commonly recognized, and incorporates elements of physical poses, breath control and meditation, and self-restraint (including that of diet, smoking, alcohol intake and sleep patterns). A Cochrane review reported a 27% reduction in total mortality and 19% reduction in total mortality and non-fatal cardiac events with cardiac rehabilitation (CR), comparing favorably to effective pharmacological treatments (e.g. antiplatelets, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, statins and beta-blockers). Yoga, therefore, could provide a useful frame work on which to develop an economical CR program, with additional advantages of being culturally appropriate to Indians and potentially be appealing to global population.

Get Citation

Keywords

cardiovascular diseases, cardiac rehabilitation, Hatha yoga, transcatheter therapeutics, Yoga-CaRe

About this article
Title

Yoga and Cardiac Rehabilitation (Yoga-CaRe) in post-acute coronary syndrome patients

Journal

Folia Cardiologica

Issue

Vol 12, No 2 (2017)

Pages

179-186

Published online

2017-04-20

DOI

10.5603/FC.2017.0026

Bibliographic record

Folia Cardiologica 2017;12(2):179-186.

Keywords

cardiovascular diseases
cardiac rehabilitation
Hatha yoga
transcatheter therapeutics
Yoga-CaRe

Authors

Santosh Kumar Sinha
Vinay Krishna
Vikas Mishra
Karandeep Singh
Ashutosh Kumar
Mukesh Jitendra Jha
Mahmadula Razi
Mohammad Asif
Nasar Abdali
Ramesh Thakur
Chandra Mohan Varma

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