open access

Vol 9, No 3 (2014)
Young Cardiology
Published online: 2014-09-19
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Effect of work activity on the prevalence of smoking and knowledge of its health consequences

Katarzyna Dziubek, Iwona Gorczyca-Michta, Martyna Samiczak, Ewa Maroszyńska-Dmoch, Kamil Michta, Beata Wożakowska-Kapłon
Folia Cardiologica 2014;9(3):246-253.

open access

Vol 9, No 3 (2014)
Young Cardiology
Published online: 2014-09-19

Abstract

Introduction. Smoking is a major cause of mortality worldwide. Higher unemployment rates increase the risk of premature death and illness. The aim of the study was to assess the prevalence of smoking and knowledge regarding health consequences of smoking among unemployed and working persons. We also evaluated the degree of nicotine dependence and motivation to quit smoking among smokers, and exposure to passive smoking among non-smokers.

Material and methods. The study included 203 respondents. In the study group, 101 subjects were unemployed and 102 subjects were employed. Evaluation was based on a questionnaire devised by the authors. A part of the questionnaire was designed for smokers and included the Fagerström Nicotine Dependence Test to evaluate the degree of nicotine addiction and the Schneider Motivation Test to evaluate motivation to quit smoking.

Results. The study included 113 women (56%) and 90 men (44%). The average age of respondents was 37.8 years. In the study group, there were 78 smokers (38.4% of all respondents). Cigarettes were smoked by 34 employed persons (33.3% of the employed), and 44 unemployed persons (43.6% of the unemployed). Among smokers, 27 women (26.7%) and 17 men (16.8%) were unemployed. Lung cancer as an effect of smoking was indicated by 84 unemployed (83.1%) and 90 employed (88.2%) persons. Atherosclerosis as a consequence of smoking was indicated by 40 employed (39.2%) and 44 unemployed (43.6%) persons. Most smokers in both groups were characterized by a moderate degreeof nicotine dependence — 23 employed (67.6%) and 31 unemployed (70.4%) persons. Motivation to quit smoking was high in 26 employed (76.5%) and 26 unemployed (59.1%) persons.

Conclusions. Prevalence of smoking was higher among the unemployed persons. Knowledge about the health consequences of smoking was moderate and similar among employed and unemployed persons. Most smokers in both groups showed a moderate degree of nicotine dependence and a high degree of motivation to stop smoking.

Abstract

Introduction. Smoking is a major cause of mortality worldwide. Higher unemployment rates increase the risk of premature death and illness. The aim of the study was to assess the prevalence of smoking and knowledge regarding health consequences of smoking among unemployed and working persons. We also evaluated the degree of nicotine dependence and motivation to quit smoking among smokers, and exposure to passive smoking among non-smokers.

Material and methods. The study included 203 respondents. In the study group, 101 subjects were unemployed and 102 subjects were employed. Evaluation was based on a questionnaire devised by the authors. A part of the questionnaire was designed for smokers and included the Fagerström Nicotine Dependence Test to evaluate the degree of nicotine addiction and the Schneider Motivation Test to evaluate motivation to quit smoking.

Results. The study included 113 women (56%) and 90 men (44%). The average age of respondents was 37.8 years. In the study group, there were 78 smokers (38.4% of all respondents). Cigarettes were smoked by 34 employed persons (33.3% of the employed), and 44 unemployed persons (43.6% of the unemployed). Among smokers, 27 women (26.7%) and 17 men (16.8%) were unemployed. Lung cancer as an effect of smoking was indicated by 84 unemployed (83.1%) and 90 employed (88.2%) persons. Atherosclerosis as a consequence of smoking was indicated by 40 employed (39.2%) and 44 unemployed (43.6%) persons. Most smokers in both groups were characterized by a moderate degreeof nicotine dependence — 23 employed (67.6%) and 31 unemployed (70.4%) persons. Motivation to quit smoking was high in 26 employed (76.5%) and 26 unemployed (59.1%) persons.

Conclusions. Prevalence of smoking was higher among the unemployed persons. Knowledge about the health consequences of smoking was moderate and similar among employed and unemployed persons. Most smokers in both groups showed a moderate degree of nicotine dependence and a high degree of motivation to stop smoking.

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Keywords

smoking, professional activity, health consequences

About this article
Title

Effect of work activity on the prevalence of smoking and knowledge of its health consequences

Journal

Folia Cardiologica

Issue

Vol 9, No 3 (2014)

Pages

246-253

Published online

2014-09-19

Bibliographic record

Folia Cardiologica 2014;9(3):246-253.

Keywords

smoking
professional activity
health consequences

Authors

Katarzyna Dziubek
Iwona Gorczyca-Michta
Martyna Samiczak
Ewa Maroszyńska-Dmoch
Kamil Michta
Beata Wożakowska-Kapłon

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