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Vol 9, No 4 (2013)
Prace oryginalne
Published online: 2013-12-31
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Treatment of chronic venous disease in obese subjects

Kamil Barański, Piotr Kocełak, Magdalena Olszanecka-Glinianowicz, Jerzy Chudek
Endokrynol. Otył. Zab. Przem. Mat 2013;9(4):146-152.

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Vol 9, No 4 (2013)
Prace oryginalne
Published online: 2013-12-31

Abstract

INTRODUCTION. Obesity, especially visceral obesity, is a risk factor for chronic venous disease (CVD). Excess visceral fat deposit is associated with increased intra-abdominal pressure, causing impairment of venous outflow from the lower extremities. Obesity also promotes CVD progression due to its influence on the development of lipodermatosclerosis and venous ulcers. Low physical activity is another obesity related factor contributing to the CVD development and progression, particularly in women. The paper presents the current state of knowledge concerning the prevention and treatment of CVD in obese patients.

MATERIAL AND METHODS. Review of the literature was based on medical databases: PubMed and ScienceDirect. The selection of 46 relevant original studies was done on the basis of a combination of keywords such as: ‘chronic venous disease’, ‘chronic venous insufficiency’, ‘varicose veins obesity’, ‘obese’, ‘compression therapy’, ‘compression stockings’, and ‘pharmacotherapy’.

RESULTS. Obesity, especially class II and class III obesity, is associated with a lower use of compression therapy (compression stockings), the most effective method of CVD therapy in patients with CEAP stage C2 or higher. The chronic use of phlebotropic drugs is the conservative method, most commonly used by obese patients. However, the acceptance of such therapy by obese is slightly lower than by normal weight patients. So far, the impact of obesity on the choice of surgical procedures for CVD and patient preferences was overlooked. However, the recurrence rate of varicose veins in the follow-up after surgery is increased in obese patients.

CONCLUSIONS. Obesity is associated with significantly reduced acceptance of compression therapy and, to less extend, medication in CVD patients. The influence of obesity on the choice of surgical methods in CVD is poorly elucidated. Obesity seems to be a risk factor for recurrent varicose veins after surgery.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION. Obesity, especially visceral obesity, is a risk factor for chronic venous disease (CVD). Excess visceral fat deposit is associated with increased intra-abdominal pressure, causing impairment of venous outflow from the lower extremities. Obesity also promotes CVD progression due to its influence on the development of lipodermatosclerosis and venous ulcers. Low physical activity is another obesity related factor contributing to the CVD development and progression, particularly in women. The paper presents the current state of knowledge concerning the prevention and treatment of CVD in obese patients.

MATERIAL AND METHODS. Review of the literature was based on medical databases: PubMed and ScienceDirect. The selection of 46 relevant original studies was done on the basis of a combination of keywords such as: ‘chronic venous disease’, ‘chronic venous insufficiency’, ‘varicose veins obesity’, ‘obese’, ‘compression therapy’, ‘compression stockings’, and ‘pharmacotherapy’.

RESULTS. Obesity, especially class II and class III obesity, is associated with a lower use of compression therapy (compression stockings), the most effective method of CVD therapy in patients with CEAP stage C2 or higher. The chronic use of phlebotropic drugs is the conservative method, most commonly used by obese patients. However, the acceptance of such therapy by obese is slightly lower than by normal weight patients. So far, the impact of obesity on the choice of surgical procedures for CVD and patient preferences was overlooked. However, the recurrence rate of varicose veins in the follow-up after surgery is increased in obese patients.

CONCLUSIONS. Obesity is associated with significantly reduced acceptance of compression therapy and, to less extend, medication in CVD patients. The influence of obesity on the choice of surgical methods in CVD is poorly elucidated. Obesity seems to be a risk factor for recurrent varicose veins after surgery.

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Keywords

CVD, obesity, compression therapy, BMI, phlebotropic drugs

About this article
Title

Treatment of chronic venous disease in obese subjects

Journal

Endocrinology, Obesity and Metabolic Disorders

Issue

Vol 9, No 4 (2013)

Pages

146-152

Published online

2013-12-31

Bibliographic record

Endokrynol. Otył. Zab. Przem. Mat 2013;9(4):146-152.

Keywords

CVD
obesity
compression therapy
BMI
phlebotropic drugs

Authors

Kamil Barański
Piotr Kocełak
Magdalena Olszanecka-Glinianowicz
Jerzy Chudek

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