open access

Vol 74, No 4 (2023)
Review paper
Submitted: 2023-02-22
Accepted: 2023-03-13
Published online: 2023-06-30
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The influence of SGLT2 inhibitors on oxidative stress in heart failure and chronic kidney disease in patients with type 2 diabetes

Diana Nabrdalik-Leśniak1, Katarzyna Nabrdalik23, Krzysztof Irlik4, Oliwia Janota1, Hanna Kwiendacz2, Paulina Szromek-Białek2, Mirosław Maziarz2, Tomasz Stompór5, Janusz Gumprecht2, Gregory Y. H. Lip36
·
Pubmed: 37431873
·
Endokrynol Pol 2023;74(4):349-362.
Affiliations
  1. Doctoral School, Department of Internal Medicine, Diabetology, and Nephrology, Faculty of Medical Sciences in Zabrze, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland
  2. Department of Internal Medicine, Diabetology and Nephrology, Faculty of Medical Sciences in Zabrze, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland
  3. Liverpool Centre for Cardiovascular Science at University of Liverpool, Liverpool John Moores University and Liverpool Heart & Chest Hospital, Liverpool, United Kingdom
  4. Students’ Scientific Association by the Department of Internal Medicine, Diabetology and Nephrology, Faculty of Medical Sciences in Zabrze, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland
  5. Department of Nephrology, Hypertensiology, and Internal Diseases, University of Warmia and Mazury, Olsztyn, Poland
  6. Department of Clinical Medicine, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark

open access

Vol 74, No 4 (2023)
Review Article
Submitted: 2023-02-22
Accepted: 2023-03-13
Published online: 2023-06-30

Abstract

There is increasing interest in sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors (SGLT2i) as not only a new oral glucose-lowering drug class but also one with cardio- and nephroprotective potential. Understanding the underlying mechanisms is therefore of great interest, and postulated benefits have included increased natriuresis, lower blood pressure, increased haematocrit, enhanced cardiac fatty acid utilization, reduced low-grade inflammation, and decreased oxidative stress. In particular, redox homeostasis seems to be crucial in the pathogenesis of heart and kidney disease in diabetes, and there is accumulating evidence that SGLT2i have beneficial effects in this perspective.

In this review, we aimed to summarize the potential mechanisms of the influence of SGLT2i on oxidative stress parameters in animal and human studies, with a special focus on heart failure and chronic kidney disease in diabetes mellitus.

Abstract

There is increasing interest in sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors (SGLT2i) as not only a new oral glucose-lowering drug class but also one with cardio- and nephroprotective potential. Understanding the underlying mechanisms is therefore of great interest, and postulated benefits have included increased natriuresis, lower blood pressure, increased haematocrit, enhanced cardiac fatty acid utilization, reduced low-grade inflammation, and decreased oxidative stress. In particular, redox homeostasis seems to be crucial in the pathogenesis of heart and kidney disease in diabetes, and there is accumulating evidence that SGLT2i have beneficial effects in this perspective.

In this review, we aimed to summarize the potential mechanisms of the influence of SGLT2i on oxidative stress parameters in animal and human studies, with a special focus on heart failure and chronic kidney disease in diabetes mellitus.

Get Citation

Keywords

sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors; oxidative stress; diabetes mellitus; chronic kidney disease; heart failure

About this article
Title

The influence of SGLT2 inhibitors on oxidative stress in heart failure and chronic kidney disease in patients with type 2 diabetes

Journal

Endokrynologia Polska

Issue

Vol 74, No 4 (2023)

Article type

Review paper

Pages

349-362

Published online

2023-06-30

Page views

1225

Article views/downloads

553

DOI

10.5603/EP.a2023.0039

Pubmed

37431873

Bibliographic record

Endokrynol Pol 2023;74(4):349-362.

Keywords

sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors
oxidative stress
diabetes mellitus
chronic kidney disease
heart failure

Authors

Diana Nabrdalik-Leśniak
Katarzyna Nabrdalik
Krzysztof Irlik
Oliwia Janota
Hanna Kwiendacz
Paulina Szromek-Białek
Mirosław Maziarz
Tomasz Stompór
Janusz Gumprecht
Gregory Y. H. Lip

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