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Ahead of print
Original papers
Published online: 2019-05-28
Submitted: 2019-03-28
Accepted: 2019-05-14
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Associations of oxytocin with metabolic parameters in obese women of childbearing age

Du Fu-Man, Kuang Hong-Yu, Duan Bin-Hong, Liu Da-Na, Yu Xin-Yang
DOI: 10.5603/EP.a2019.0028
·
Pubmed: 31135057

open access

Ahead of print
Original papers
Published online: 2019-05-28
Submitted: 2019-03-28
Accepted: 2019-05-14

Abstract

Objective: The aim of this study was to compare plasma oxytocin levels in obese women of childbearing age with non-obese women of childbearing age and to investigate the relationship between plasma oxytocin levels and metabolic parameters (including blood glucose, insulin resistance, blood lipid, and blood pressure). Methods: 151 obese women of childbearing age and 160 non-obese women of childbearing age were enrolled in this study. Plasma oxytocin levels were measured by electrochemiluminescence immunoassays. Height, body weight, body mass index (BMI), fasting blood glucose (FBG), fasting insulin (FI), homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), total triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC) , low density lipoprotein-C (LDL-C), high density lipoprotein-C (HDL-C), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were measured in all subjects. Quantile regression analysis was used to analyze the associations of plasma oxytocin levels with FBG, FI, HOMA-IR, TG, TC, LDL-C, HDL-C, SBP and DBP. Results: In obese women of childbearing age, plasma oxytocin levels were lower compared to non-obese controls. After adjusting for age, quantile regression analysis showed that the plasma oxytocin levels were inversely associated with HOMA-IR at the quantile level between 0.27 and 0.79 (i.e. the HOMA-IR level of 2.11 and 3.07, respectively), the plasma oxytocin levels were inversely associated with TC after the quantile level of 0.21 (i.e. the TC level of 3.78 ), the plasma oxytocin levels were inversely associated with LDL-C at all quantile levels of LDL-C. In addition, the plasma oxytocin levels showed an positive association with HDL-C at all quantile levels of HDL-C. No significant associations were found between the plasma oxytocin levels and FBG, FI, TG, SBP, DBP. Conclusions: Oxytocin deficiency was common in obese women of childbearing age. Oxytocin showed negative correlation with HOMA-IR, TC and LDL-C, while it shows positive association with HDL-C. Our findings suggested that oxytocin played an important role in inhibiting metabolic disorders associated obesity.

Abstract

Objective: The aim of this study was to compare plasma oxytocin levels in obese women of childbearing age with non-obese women of childbearing age and to investigate the relationship between plasma oxytocin levels and metabolic parameters (including blood glucose, insulin resistance, blood lipid, and blood pressure). Methods: 151 obese women of childbearing age and 160 non-obese women of childbearing age were enrolled in this study. Plasma oxytocin levels were measured by electrochemiluminescence immunoassays. Height, body weight, body mass index (BMI), fasting blood glucose (FBG), fasting insulin (FI), homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), total triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC) , low density lipoprotein-C (LDL-C), high density lipoprotein-C (HDL-C), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were measured in all subjects. Quantile regression analysis was used to analyze the associations of plasma oxytocin levels with FBG, FI, HOMA-IR, TG, TC, LDL-C, HDL-C, SBP and DBP. Results: In obese women of childbearing age, plasma oxytocin levels were lower compared to non-obese controls. After adjusting for age, quantile regression analysis showed that the plasma oxytocin levels were inversely associated with HOMA-IR at the quantile level between 0.27 and 0.79 (i.e. the HOMA-IR level of 2.11 and 3.07, respectively), the plasma oxytocin levels were inversely associated with TC after the quantile level of 0.21 (i.e. the TC level of 3.78 ), the plasma oxytocin levels were inversely associated with LDL-C at all quantile levels of LDL-C. In addition, the plasma oxytocin levels showed an positive association with HDL-C at all quantile levels of HDL-C. No significant associations were found between the plasma oxytocin levels and FBG, FI, TG, SBP, DBP. Conclusions: Oxytocin deficiency was common in obese women of childbearing age. Oxytocin showed negative correlation with HOMA-IR, TC and LDL-C, while it shows positive association with HDL-C. Our findings suggested that oxytocin played an important role in inhibiting metabolic disorders associated obesity.

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Keywords

oxytocin; obesity; women; childbearing; body mess index; insulin resistance; Lipids; quantile regression analysis

About this article
Title

Associations of oxytocin with metabolic parameters in obese women of childbearing age

Journal

Endokrynologia Polska

Issue

Ahead of print

Published online

2019-05-28

DOI

10.5603/EP.a2019.0028

Pubmed

31135057

Keywords

oxytocin
obesity
women
childbearing
body mess index
insulin resistance
Lipids
quantile regression analysis

Authors

Du Fu-Man
Kuang Hong-Yu
Duan Bin-Hong
Liu Da-Na
Yu Xin-Yang

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